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Is it correct implementation of lazy-initializing singleton using AtomicReference? If no - what are the possible issues?

import java.io.ObjectStreamException;
import java.io.Serializable;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicReference;

public class Singleton implements Serializable {

    private static final Singleton _instance = new Singleton();

    private static AtomicReference<Singleton> instance = new AtomicReference<Singleton>();

    private Singleton() {
    }

    public static Singleton getInstance() {
        if (instance.compareAndSet(null, _instance)) {
            synchronized (_instance) {
                _instance.init();
                instance.set(_instance);
            }
        }
        return instance.get();
    }

    private void init() {
        // do initialization
    }

    private Object readResolve() throws ObjectStreamException {
        return getInstance();
    }

}
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Changing the code in your question after answers have been posted is not nice. –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 9 '11 at 14:35
    
@Sean Patrick Floyd Perhaps, but the new code more clearly demonstrates the problem that it still has. Although it does add deserialisation into the mix. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 9 '11 at 16:18

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

No, this is bad:

public static Singleton getInstance() {
    // new "singleton" for every method call
    Singleton s = new Singleton();
                   ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    if (instance.compareAndSet(null, s)) {
        synchronized (s) {
            s.init();
        }
    }
    return instance.get();
}

Using an AtomicReference is a nice idea, but it won't work because Java doesn't have lazy evaluation.


The classic post 1.5 singleton methods are:

Eager Singleton:

public final class Singleton{
    private Singleton(){}
    private static final Singleton INSTANCE = new Singleton();
    public Singleton getInstance(){return INSTANCE;}
}

Lazy Singleton with inner holder class:

public final class Singleton{
    private Singleton(){}
    private static class Holder{
        private static final Singleton INSTANCE = new Singleton();
    }
    public Singleton getInstance(){return Holder.INSTANCE;}
}

Enum Singleton:

public enum Singleton{
    INSTANCE;
}

You should probably stick with one of these

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Okay, so may be having Singleton instantiated only once and then making assignment on successful initialization? –  jdevelop May 9 '11 at 14:22
    
"only once" is exactly the problem here. If you use one of the methods I listed, "only once" is guaranteed. Otherwise: you can get close to guaranteeing "only once", but you can't get 100%, and the coding is a pain –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 9 '11 at 14:26
    
public Singleton getInstance(){return INSTANCE;} isn't thread safe. also one can get hack into it if they serialize it to obtain another object –  Jigar Joshi May 9 '11 at 14:27
    
@Jigar: yes, it is thread safe, static fields are initialized before methods are executed, but you are right about serialization attacks –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 9 '11 at 14:29
1  
Use the "Enum Singleton". It is the most robust. IIRC, it is immune to serialization attacks. –  KitsuneYMG May 9 '11 at 14:36

You've got a race condition, in that you may return an instance of the Singleton before init is called on it. You could wrap singleton if you wanted a once-only init. However, we know how to implement singletons in a simple, efficiently manner and mutable singletons are pure evil..

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You can prevent serialization scenario to make it singleton forcefully .

all your constructor should be private.

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I don't see why you would need to use AtomicReference for a singleton: AtomicReference allows you to atomically change ther reference to the object -- and in the case of a singleton there should be one instance only and no one should be able to change that ever again for the execution of your app. Also your code is not synchronized, so concurrent requests will end up creating multiple instances of the Singleton class (as pointed out by @Sean Patrick Floyd for instance).

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Well, I think that I fixed that. can you please take a look at the post? –  jdevelop May 9 '11 at 14:28
public static Singleton getInstance() {
    Singleton s=instance.get();
    if(s!=null)synchronized(s){return s;}//already initialised ->return it
    Singleton s = new Singleton();
    synchronized(s){
         if(instance.compareAndSet(null, s))//try to set
              s.init();
    }
    return instance.get();//use the one that is there after CaS (guaranteed not null)
}
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1  
Presumably the idea of the separate init is that you only run that part once. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 9 '11 at 14:30
    
you can also put it after the CaS and have init check whether it's been called already but I couldn't really find a good thread-safe way to do it (after CaS succeeds another Thread can get the uninitialized singleton) nvm found one –  ratchet freak May 9 '11 at 14:35
    
Um, still a race in that code that I'm sure of. It's really ugly and completely unnecessary. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 9 '11 at 16:07
    
I see it: replace the last get with getInstance and no uninitialised singleton will ever be returned though it is really a big hack and using class loading semantics is sufficient for this –  ratchet freak May 9 '11 at 16:14

The updated code adds deserialisation with readResolve.

Two obvious problems here.

  • Back references can read the original object before readResolve is called.

  • Even though the class has only a private constructor, it is not final. final is really important. A hand-crafted (or created with a jig Singleton implementation) octet sequence could deserialise into a subclass. (The no-args constructor of the most derived non-serialisable base class (which must be accessible to the most base serialisable class) is called by the deserialisation machinery.) An inaccessible readResolve is not called for subclasses.

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