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I need to calculate the DateDiff (hours) between two dates, but only during business-hours (8:30 - 16:00, no weekends). This result will then be put into the Reaction_Time column as per the example below.

ID           Date           Reaction_Time   Overdue
1    29.04.2003 15:00:00                      
1    30.04.2003 11:00:00        3:30        
2    30.04.2003 14:00:00                      
2    01.05.2003 14:00:00        7:30          YES

*Note: I didn't check to see if the dates in example were holidays.

I'm using SQL Server 2005

This will be combined with a bigger query, but for now all I need is this to get started, I'll try to figure out how to put it all together on my own. Thanks for the help!

Edit: Hey, thanks everyone for the replies. But due to the obvious complexity of a solution on SQL side, it was decided we would do this in Excel instead as that's where the report will be moved anyway. Sorry for the trouble, but I really figured it would be simpler than this. As it is, we just don't have the time.

share|improve this question
    
i didn't quite get the question –  tehvan Feb 27 '09 at 7:59
    
Me neither. Read it a few times now to no avail. Can you at least give us some of the data in the original table? Ideally the data that makes your example result plausible. –  Tomalak Feb 27 '09 at 8:01
    
i guess he wants to do a DateDiff on the rows with the same ID, but only count BUSINESS HOURS –  roman m Feb 27 '09 at 8:03
    
Edited the post. :) –  Zan Feb 27 '09 at 8:17
    
@Zan: You don't have the time to move one of the working solutions posted here to your database, but you do have the time to implement something from scratch in Excel? I don't get it... –  Tomalak Feb 28 '09 at 9:00
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
DECLARE @BusHourStart DATETIME, @BusHourEnd DATETIME
SELECT @BusHourStart = '08:30:00', @BusHourEnd = '16:00:00'
DECLARE @BusMinutesStart INT, @BusMinutesEnd INT
SELECT @BusMinutesStart = DATEPART(minute,@BusHourStart)+DATEPART(hour,@BusHourStart)*60, 
@BusMinutesEnd = DATEPART(minute,@BusHourEnd)+DATEPART(hour,@BusHourEnd)*60 
DECLARE @Dates2 TABLE (ID INT, DateStart DATETIME, DateEnd DATETIME)
INSERT INTO @Dates2
SELECT 1, '15:00:00 04/29/2003', '11:00:00 04/30/2003' UNION
SELECT 2, '14:00:00 04/30/2003', '14:00:00 05/01/2003' UNION
SELECT 3, '14:00:00 05/02/2003', '14:00:00 05/06/2003' UNION
SELECT 4, '14:00:00 05/02/2003', '14:00:00 05/04/2003' UNION
SELECT 5, '07:00:00 05/02/2003', '14:00:00 05/02/2003' UNION
SELECT 6, '14:00:00 05/02/2003', '23:00:00 05/02/2003' UNION
SELECT 7, '07:00:00 05/02/2003', '08:00:00 05/02/2003' UNION
SELECT 8, '22:00:00 05/02/2003', '23:00:00 05/03/2003' UNION
SELECT 9, '08:00:00 05/03/2003', '23:00:00 05/04/2003' UNION
SELECT 10, '07:00:00 05/02/2003', '23:00:00 05/02/2003' 

-- SET DATEFIRST to U.S. English default value of 7.
SET DATEFIRST 7

SELECT ID, DateStart, DateEnd, CONVERT(VARCHAR, Minutes/60) +':'+ CONVERT(VARCHAR, Minutes % 60) AS ReactionTime
FROM ( 
    SELECT ID, DateStart, DateEnd, Overtime,
        CASE 
    		WHEN DayDiff = 0 THEN 
    			CASE 
    				WHEN (MinutesEnd - MinutesStart - Overtime) > 0 THEN (MinutesEnd - MinutesStart - Overtime) 
    				ELSE 0 
    				END
            WHEN DayDiff > 0  THEN 
    			CASE 
    				WHEN (StartPart + EndPart - Overtime) > 0 THEN (StartPart + EndPart - Overtime) 
    				ELSE 0 
    				END + DayPart
    		ELSE 0
        END AS Minutes 
    FROM(
        SELECT ID, DateStart, DateEnd, DayDiff, MinutesStart, MinutesEnd,
                CASE WHEN(@BusMinutesStart - MinutesStart) > 0 THEN (@BusMinutesStart - MinutesStart) ELSE 0 END +
                CASE WHEN(MinutesEnd - @BusMinutesEnd) > 0 THEN (MinutesEnd - @BusMinutesEnd) ELSE 0 END AS Overtime, 
                CASE WHEN(@BusMinutesEnd - MinutesStart) > 0 THEN (@BusMinutesEnd - MinutesStart) ELSE 0 END AS StartPart,
                CASE WHEN(MinutesEnd - @BusMinutesStart) > 0 THEN (MinutesEnd - @BusMinutesStart) ELSE 0 END AS EndPart,
                CASE WHEN DayDiff > 1 THEN (@BusMinutesEnd - @BusMinutesStart)*(DayDiff - 1) ELSE 0 END AS DayPart
        FROM (
                SELECT DATEDIFF(d,DateStart, DateEnd) AS DayDiff, ID, DateStart, DateEnd,  
                DATEPART(minute,DateStart)+DATEPART(hour,DateStart)*60 AS MinutesStart,
                DATEPART(minute,DateEnd)+DATEPART(hour,DateEnd)*60 AS MinutesEnd 
                FROM (
                        SELECT ID,
                                CASE 
                                        WHEN DATEPART(dw, DateStart) = 7 
                                        THEN DATEADD(SECOND, 1, DATEADD(DAY, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, DateStart), 2))
                                        WHEN DATEPART(dw, DateStart) = 1 
                                        THEN DATEADD(SECOND, 1, DATEADD(DAY, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, DateStart), 1))
                                ELSE DateStart END AS DateStart,
                                CASE 
                                        WHEN DATEPART(dw, DateEnd) = 7 
                                        THEN DATEADD(SECOND, -1, DATEADD(DAY, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, DateEnd), 0))
                                        WHEN DATEPART(dw, DateEnd) = 1 
                                        THEN DATEADD(SECOND, -1, DATEADD(DAY, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, DateEnd), -1))
                                ELSE DateEnd END AS DateEnd FROM @Dates2
                )Weekends
        )InMinutes
    )Overtime
)Calculation
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way I can copy this code without loosing the carraige returns and other white space? –  MatBailie Feb 27 '09 at 10:44
    
select it all with mouse pointer, copy and past –  Max Gontar Feb 27 '09 at 10:58
1  
Okay, let me emphasise something here :) I asked how to "copy this code without loosing the carraige returns and other white space", this implies that my monkey like abilities extended far enough to trying to copy and paste. But I keep loosing the carriage returns, etc :) –  MatBailie Feb 27 '09 at 11:27
    
A normal copy/paste always works for me - whitespace and all. –  Tom H. Feb 27 '09 at 12:01
    
whats your browser Dems? –  Max Gontar Feb 27 '09 at 12:03
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I would recommend building a user defined function that calculates the date difference in business hours according to your rules.

SELECT
  Id,
  MIN(Date) DateStarted,
  MAX(Date) DateCompleted,
  dbo.udfDateDiffBusinessHours(MIN(Date), MAX(Date)) ReactionTime
FROM
  Incident
GROUP BY
  Id

I'm not sure where your Overdue value comes from, so I left it off in my example.

In a function you can write way more expressive SQL than in a query, and you don't clog your query with business rules, making it hard to maintain.

Also a function can easily be reused. Extending it to include support for holidays (I'm thinking of a Holidays table here) would not be too hard. Further refinements are possible without the need to change hard to read nested SELECT/CASE WHEN constructs, which would be the alternative.

If I have time today, I'll look into writing an example function.


EDIT: Here is something with bells and whistles, calculating around weekends transparently:

ALTER FUNCTION dbo.udfDateDiffBusinessHours (
  @date1 DATETIME,
  @date2 DATETIME
) RETURNS DATETIME AS
BEGIN
  DECLARE @sat INT
  DECLARE @sun INT
  DECLARE @workday_s INT
  DECLARE @workday_e INT
  DECLARE @basedate1 DATETIME
  DECLARE @basedate2 DATETIME
  DECLARE @calcdate1 DATETIME
  DECLARE @calcdate2 DATETIME
  DECLARE @cworkdays INT
  DECLARE @cweekends INT
  DECLARE @returnval INT

  SET @workday_s = 510 -- work day start:  8.5 hours
  SET @workday_e = 960 -- work day end:   16.0 hours

    -- calculate Saturday and Sunday dependent on SET DATEFIRST option
  SET @sat = CASE @@DATEFIRST WHEN 7 THEN 7 ELSE 7 - @@DATEFIRST END 
  SET @sun = CASE @@DATEFIRST WHEN 7 THEN 1 ELSE @sat + 1 END 

  SET @calcdate1 = @date1
  SET @calcdate2 = @date2

  -- @date1: assume next day if start was after end of workday
  SET @basedate1 = DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, @calcdate1))
  SET @calcdate1 = CASE WHEN DATEDIFF(mi, @basedate1, @calcdate1) > @workday_e
                   THEN @basedate1 + 1
                   ELSE @calcdate1
                   END

  -- @date1: if Saturday or Sunday, make it next Monday
  SET @basedate1 = DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, @calcdate1))
  SET @calcdate1 = CASE DATEPART(dw, @basedate1)
                   WHEN @sat THEN @basedate1 + 2
                   WHEN @sun THEN @basedate1 + 1
                   ELSE @calcdate1
                   END

  -- @date1: assume @workday_s as the minimum start time
  SET @basedate1 = DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, @calcdate1))
  SET @calcdate1 = CASE WHEN DATEDIFF(mi, @basedate1, @calcdate1) < @workday_s 
                   THEN DATEADD(mi, @workday_s, @basedate1)
                   ELSE @calcdate1
                   END

  -- @date2: assume previous day if end was before start of workday
  SET @basedate2 = DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, @calcdate2))
  SET @calcdate2 = CASE WHEN DATEDIFF(mi, @basedate2, @calcdate2) < @workday_s
                   THEN @basedate2 - 1
                   ELSE @calcdate2
                   END

  -- @date2: if Saturday or Sunday, make it previous Friday
  SET @basedate2 = DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, @calcdate2))
  SET @calcdate2 = CASE DATEPART(dw, @calcdate2)
                   WHEN @sat THEN @basedate2 - 0.00001
                   WHEN @sun THEN @basedate2 - 1.00001
                   ELSE @date2
                   END

  -- @date2: assume @workday_e as the maximum end time
  SET @basedate2 = DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, @calcdate2))
  SET @calcdate2 = CASE WHEN DATEDIFF(mi, @basedate2, @calcdate2) > @workday_e
                   THEN DATEADD(mi, @workday_e, @basedate2)
                   ELSE @calcdate2
                   END

  -- count full work days (subtract Saturdays and Sundays)
  SET @cworkdays = DATEDIFF(dd, @basedate1, @basedate2)
  SET @cweekends = @cworkdays / 7
  SET @cworkdays = @cworkdays - @cweekends * 2

  -- calculate effective duration in minutes
  SET @returnval = @cworkdays * (@workday_e - @workday_s)
                   + @workday_e - DATEDIFF(mi, @basedate1, @calcdate1) 
                   + DATEDIFF(mi, @basedate2, @calcdate2) - @workday_e

  -- return duration as an offset in minutes from date 0
  RETURN DATEADD(mi, @returnval, 0)
END

The function returns a DATETIME value meant as an offset from date 0 (which is "1900-01-01 00:00:00"). So for example a timespan of 8:00 hours would be "1900-01-01 08:00:00" and 25 hours would be "1900-01-02 01:00:00". The function result is the time difference in business hours between two dates. No special handling/support for overtime.

SELECT dbo.udfDateDiffBusinessHours('2003-04-29 15:00:00', '2003-04-30 11:00:00')
--> 1900-01-01 03:30:00.000

SELECT dbo.udfDateDiffBusinessHours('2003-04-30 14:00:00', '2003-05-01 14:00:00')
--> 1900-01-01 07:30:00.000

The function assumes the start of the next available work day (08:30 h) when the @date1 is off-hours, and the end of the previous available work day (16:00 h) when @date2 is off-hours.

"next/previous available" means:

  • if @date1 is '2009-02-06 07:00:00' (Fri), it will become '2009-02-06 08:30:00' (Fri)
  • if @date1 is '2009-02-06 19:00:00' (Fri), it will become '2009-02-09 08:30:00' (Mon)
  • if @date2 is '2009-02-09 07:00:00' (Mon), it will become '2009-02-06 16:00:00' (Fri)
  • if @date2 is '2009-02-09 19:00:00' (Mon), it will become '2009-02-09 16:00:00' (Mon)
share|improve this answer
    
We don't have any business-hour reference calendars here, that's why I support your idea of being able to create the rules myself. I don't have the permission to add tables to the DB, so the functions etc will have to be created within the same query. But thanks, I'll look into this. :) –  Zan Feb 27 '09 at 9:40
    
The layout and comments are great in this solution. It doesn't work for me though because it assumes at least one week has passed (SET @cweekends = @cworkdays / 7). If the interval is Thursday through Tuesday, no weekends are factored in. I may try to alter this query though. If I get it working for my situation I'll post and give appropriate credit to you Tomalak. I'm not nearly as skilled in SQL though so no promises! :) –  Dzejms Aug 17 '10 at 14:17
    
Posted my solution: stackoverflow.com/questions/3503749/… –  Dzejms Aug 17 '10 at 14:59
1  
I modified this to make an "shipped within company's SLA" report. Great job! –  JasonRShaver May 24 '11 at 4:56
    
@Jason Thanks for the feedback! :) –  Tomalak May 24 '11 at 6:50
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select datediff(hh,@date1,@date2) - 16.5*(datediff(dd,@date1,@date2))

The only catch is that it will give you 3:30 as 3.5 hours but you can fix that easily.

share|improve this answer
    
What if the second event was at 17:00? It doesn't state in the question if that is possible or not. Your answer seems fine if it's not possible :) –  MatBailie Feb 27 '09 at 10:04
    
Oh, but it fails for weekends, etc... –  MatBailie Feb 27 '09 at 10:05
    
Tried this but it doesn't recognize the actual start and end times, or something. For example, if @date1 = '2009/01/2 16:00', and @date2 = '2009/1/3 09:00' the datediff returns 0.5 hours. But if I change date one clock to 15:30, it returns 1.5 hours when it should be just 1. How come? –  Zan Feb 27 '09 at 10:19
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Use this code : to find out weekend in between dates

 (
    DATEDIFF(dd, open_date, zassignment_date) + 1 
    - ( (DATEDIFF(dd, open_date, zassignment_date) + 1) 
    -(DATEDIFF(wk, open_date, zassignment_date) * 2) 
    -(CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw,  open_date) = 'Sunday' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) 
    -(CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw, zassignment_date) = 'Saturday' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) )) wk_end 
share|improve this answer
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Assuming you have a reference-table of the working days (and their hours), then I would use a 3 stage approach (pseudo-sql)

(first preclude the "all in one day" trivial example, since that simplifies the logic)

 -- days that are neither the start nor end (full days)
 SELECT @FullDayHours = SUM(day start to day end)
 FROM   reference-calendar
 WHERE  Start >= midnight-after-start and End <= midnight-before-end

 -- time after the [query start] to the end of the first working day
 SELECT @FirstDayHours = [query start] to day end
 FROM   reference-calandar
 WHERE  start day

 -- time from the start of the last working day to the [query end]
 SELECT @LastDayHours = day start to [query end]
 FROM   reference-calendar
 WHERE  end-day

 IF @FirstDayHours < 0 SET @FirstDayHours = 0 -- starts outside working time
 IF @LastDayHours < 0 SET @LastDayHours  = 0 -- ends outside working time

 PRINT @FirstDayHours  + @FullDayHours + @LastDayHours

Obviously it is a bit hard to do properly without more context...

share|improve this answer
    
That's fine if you want just a single answer, what if you want to process a whole table? –  MatBailie Feb 27 '09 at 10:05
    
I never said it was easy... –  Marc Gravell Feb 27 '09 at 10:54
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