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i have a MySQL SELECT query which fetches data from 6 tables using Mysql JOIN. here is the MySQL query i am using.

SELECT
u.id,u.password,
u.registerDate,
u.lastVisitDate,
u.lastVisitIp,
u.activationString,
u.active,
u.block,
u.gender,
u.contact_id,
c.name,
c.email,
c.pPhone,
c.sPhone,
c.area_id,
a.name as areaName, 
a.city_id, 
ct.name as cityName, 
ct.state_id,
s.name as stateName,
s.country_id,
cn.name as countryName
FROM users u
LEFT JOIN contacts c ON (u.contact_id = c.id)
LEFT JOIN areas a ON (c.area_id = a.id)
LEFT JOIN cities ct ON (a.city_id = ct.id)
LEFT JOIN states s ON (ct.state_id = s.id)
LEFT JOIN countries cn ON (s.country_id = c.id)

although query works perfectly fine it sometimes returns duplicate results if it finds any duplicate values when using LEFT JOIN. for example in contacts table there exist two rows with area id '2' which results in returning another duplicated row. how do i make a query to select only the required result without any duplicate row. is there any different type of MySQL Join i should be using?

thank you

UPDATE :

here is the contacts table, the column area_id may have several duplicate values.

enter image description here

ANSWER :

there was an error in my condition in last LEFT JOIN where i have used (s.country_id = c.id) instead it should be (s.country_id = cn.id) after splitting the query and testing individually i got to track the error. thank you for your response. it works perfectly fine now.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Duplicating the rows like you mentioned seems to indicate a data problem.

If users is your most granular table this shouldn't happen.
I'd guess, then, that it's possible for a single user to have multiple entries in contacts

You could use DISTINCT as mentioned by @dxprog but I think that GROUP BY is more appropriate here. GROUP BY whichever datapoint could potentially be duplicated.... After all, if a user has corresponding contact records, which one are you intending to JOIN to?

You must specify this if you want to remove "duplicates" because, as far as the RDBMS is concerned, the two rows matching

 LEFT JOIN contacts c ON (u.contact_id = c.id)

Are, in fact, distinct already

share|improve this answer
    
i have updated my post please have a look. – Ibrahim Azhar Armar May 9 '11 at 16:01

I think a DISTINCT may be what you're looking for:

SELECT DISTINCT
u.id,u.password,
u.registerDate,
u.lastVisitDate,
u.lastVisitIp,
u.activationString,
u.active,
u.block,
u.gender,
u.contact_id,
c.name,
c.email,
c.pPhone,
c.sPhone,
c.area_id,
a.name as areaName, 
a.city_id, 
ct.name as cityName, 
ct.state_id,
s.name as stateName,
s.country_id,
cn.name as countryName
FROM users u
LEFT JOIN contacts c ON (u.contact_id = c.id)
LEFT JOIN areas a ON (c.area_id = a.id)
LEFT JOIN cities ct ON (a.city_id = ct.id)
LEFT JOIN states s ON (ct.state_id = s.id)
LEFT JOIN countries cn ON (s.country_id = c.id)

This should only return rows where the user ID is distinct, though you may not get all the joined data you'd hoped for.

share|improve this answer
    
after using your code it returns the same set of result. the rows are being duplicated. – Ibrahim Azhar Armar May 9 '11 at 15:43

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