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Similar to SQLServer where I can do the following

create index TimeSeriesPeriodSs1 on TimeSeriesPeriod (validationStatus, completionStatus)
where completionStatus= N'Complete'  
and  validationStatus= N'Pending'
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wouldn't you just create a normal index and put the where clause in your select SQL? That way your normal index would serve another select stmt with different where clause expression hitting the same fields. Not familiar with SQL Server filtered index though, so not clear of its benefit. –  tbone May 9 '11 at 16:59
1  
@tbone - Size could be a reason –  Brendan Long May 9 '11 at 17:15
1  
@tbone: The whole point of a filtered index is to avoid the overhead of maintaining an index on a large table when only a small subset of it is needed. –  Gabe May 9 '11 at 17:20
    
Doesn't Oracle need to "maintain" the entire index anyway? If we are talking about Oracle, and function based index is the answer for this, wouldn't any and all modified rows moving forward need to apply the function (even if the result is null and isn't stored, still all DML needs to apply the function to check). So maybe a bit faster on reads, but probably slower on DML, no? What do you really gain for this overhead (and unorthodox approach imo)? Just size of index? Not trying to be difficult (ok, maybe a bit;), but very curious –  tbone May 11 '11 at 11:11
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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can create a function-based index in Oracle that leverages the fact that NULL values aren't stored in b-tree indexes. Something like

CREATE INDEX TimeSeriesPeriodSs1
    ON TimeSeriesPeriod( 
          (CASE WHEN completionStatus = 'Complete' AND validationStatus = 'Pending'
                THEN validationStatus
                ELSE NULL
            END),
          (CASE WHEN completionStatus = 'Complete' AND validationStatus = 'Pending'
                THEN completionStatus
                ELSE NULL
            END)
       );
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Damn, foiled agin... –  Alex Poole May 9 '11 at 17:14
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You might be able to use a function-based index for this, though it isn't very pleasant for this scenario:

create index TimeSeriesPeriodSs1 on TimeSeriesPeriod (
    case when validationStatus= N'Pending' and completionStatus= N'Complete' then validationStatus else null end,
    case when validationStatus= N'Pending' and completionStatus= N'Complete' then completionStatus else null end);

You'd have to make the query's where clause match exactly to make it use the index though.

select <fields>
from TimeSeriesPeriod
where case when validationStatus= N'Pending' and completionStatus= N'Complete' then validationStatus else null end = N'Pending'
and case when validationStatus= N'Pending' and completionStatus= N'Complete' then completionStatus else null end = N'Complete';

This would be a lot neater if you can define (deterministic) functions to do the case. See here for some further info and examples. Or this, from a quick Google.

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1  
+1 for including where clause to use the function based index. This is a big difference in using SQL Server's filtered index versus Oracle's function based index. –  Shannon Severance May 9 '11 at 18:51
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Here's a small variant on Justin and Alex's answer that might save further index space and makes the modified query more readable IMO:

CREATE INDEX TimeSeriesPeriodSs1
    ON TimeSeriesPeriod( 
          (CASE WHEN completionStatus = 'Complete' AND validationStatus = 'Pending'
                THEN 1
                ELSE NULL
           END);

SELECT * FROM TimeSeriesPeriod
  WHERE 1 = (CASE WHEN completionStatus = 'Complete' AND validationStatus = 'Pending'
                THEN 1
                ELSE NULL
             END)
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