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I have a website will have a background that is the full size of the screen. Because of cross-browser limitations, some of them like to keep a scroll bar even if the image is about the exact size of the screen. Is it possible for me to just remove the scroll bars?

In case you couldn't tell, I'm working with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript :)

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2  
About all you can do it overflow: none via css, but you can't directly control scrollbars in any kind of "universal" way. Removing user interface components to enforce a design is generally considered bad design. –  Marc B May 9 '11 at 16:37
2  
Does any browser take the size of the background image into account when deciding whether or not to show a scrollbar? I smell an improper implementation of bg image. –  sdleihssirhc May 9 '11 at 16:38
    
@sdleihss Yes, the entire site is currently one horrible hack. I am using a img to display the background. The results are nothing that I would ever publish. I just have to give the site to my teacher who will then give me credit on the appearance (based on the current assignment). Points for pointing that out though :) –  Xander May 9 '11 at 16:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted
body {
  overflow: hidden;
}

and for ie 7

html {
  overflow: hidden;
}
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Try property:

overflow:hidden;

See also:

http://www.w3schools.com/Css/pr_pos_overflow.asp

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Make sure your image is applied via the body tag, and if that does not work make sure it is applied to the html tag both of these tags via the Cascading Style Sheet file for example.

body {
background: url("image-src");
overflow: hidden;
}`

html {
background: url("image-src");
overflow: hidden;
}

Also remember to try and have the background image be of reasonable height and width.

Hope this helps.

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Try adding html {overflow:auto;} to your CSS declarations. Auto overflow only gives the element the scroll bars it needs, even none at all. In the case of the disabled vertical scroll bar in IE, using auto overflow will remove it if it isn't needed.

This works a little better than using hidden overflow because you're declaring it on html or body. If your browser window becomes smaller than, not only your image but, your content you won't have any scroll bars with hidden overflow. As @Marc B said in a comment, removing user interface components to enforce a design is generally considered bad design.

You can read more about the overflow property here. From the site:

IE Trick

IE displays a vertical scrollbar all the time whether it needs it or not. This can be nice > for preventing horizontal jumps, but isn't always desirable. To remove this in IE, you can > set overflow to auto on the body element.

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Overflow auto does exactly the opposite of what he wants to do. Auto adds scrollbars if content overflows. –  Stargazer712 May 9 '11 at 16:45

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