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I come from a background in C++, and I know that you cannot accurately compare floats for equality. For C#, I simply assumed the same policy applies to decimal values, or any floating point value in general.

Basically, I have two decimal values and if they are NOT equal to each other, I need to perform some action. e.g.:

decimal value1, value2;
// Assume value1 and value2 are set somewhere to valid values.
if( value1 != value2 )
{
    // Do something
}

If this doesn't work as expected, I'm willing to accept a solution that does an equality comparison with a margin of error, say like .00001 or something like that. What would be the recommended solution to this problem?

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It's not exactly the same as it relates to double rather than decimal but take a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/485175/… –  Stu Mackellar May 9 '11 at 17:16
    
@Mark: Good point. Withdrawn. –  Bob Kaufman May 9 '11 at 17:18
4  
Your posted code is the correct way to compare two decimals. If you want to compare two decimals with a margin of error, you would just do if (Math.Abs(value2 - value1) < 0.00001) { ... }. –  MusiGenesis May 9 '11 at 17:18
    
When you say "decimal", are you talking about the decimal type useful for financial and monetary calculations or are you using "decimal" as an umbrella term for a variety of floating-point formats including double, float, and decimal (as linked above)? –  Matt Ball May 9 '11 at 17:27
    
I want to clarify my usage of 'decimal' in my original post. Basically, I'm referring to the actual type 'decimal' (the actual keyword). I don't really understand what the underlying data looks like for decimal types, I simply assumed they were floating point values, where for fractional types they are never exactly the same (like with floats & doubles in C++). –  Robert Dailey May 9 '11 at 18:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Your code will work as expected. C# decimals are optimized to be very accurate at representing base 10 numbers, so if that's what you're comparing (money, ...), everything should be fine.

Here's a very clear explanation about the accuracy of decimals by Jon Skeet:

What is the difference between Decimal, Float and Double in C#?

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All of the answers provided are helplful. I'm marking this one as my answer mostly because I realized I didn't fully understand what a decimal was in C#. Decimals don't appear to be floats as I thought they were. Also the link to the article explaining the differences is very very helpful for me. –  Robert Dailey May 9 '11 at 18:19
4  
@Robert: decimals are floats in the sense that the position of the decimal point "floats around". Decimals are not "fixed point" numbers where there are, say, 15 places before the decimal point and 10 after. The difference between decimal and double is that a decimal is a number of the form m x 10^e, and a double is a number of the form m x 2^e. –  Eric Lippert May 9 '11 at 18:24

Decimals are exact numerics, you can use == or != to test for equality.

I guess I should be careful to state that it depends on the nature of the data, and what kinds of operations that you perform with whem.

As an example:

.1d + .2d == 0.3d // false
.1f + .2f == 0.3f // false
.1m + .2m == 0.3m // true
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1  
How are decimals any more exact than floats? A decimal is just a floating-point in base 10 rather than base 2. –  Gabe May 9 '11 at 17:23
    
Exactly. 1/3 can't be represented by Decimals either. Their only real advantage is that we're used to it - e.g. financial systems know and work around this kind of problem. –  delnan May 9 '11 at 17:26
    
Floats and doubles are stored as binary fractions, not decimal fractions. Whereas decimals use 'decimal' notation to store numbers.For example, 1/3 in decimal notation is 0.3333333... The same thing happens in binary notation, except that the numbers that cannot be represented precisely are different. Among them is the number 1/10. In binary notation that is 0.000110011001100... –  Liz May 9 '11 at 17:26
    
You guys are probably right. I've guess I've only ever used decimal's for tallying numbers. In which case they can be safely compared with == !=, while floats and doubles could not. –  Mark May 9 '11 at 17:33
1  
@Mark both are exact to The limits of their precision and implicit exponent. That the compiler understands literal decimals is by the by, you could represent any exact double in IL just fine too –  ShuggyCoUk May 9 '11 at 20:08

I think this will solve your problem.

Basically there is a decimal.compare method.

EDIT: This may be the better method:

Decimal.Equals

EDIT2: If you can compare directly as suggested above, that may be more efficient. I will leave this as it may be of interest.

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1  
I think that's really more for sorting... –  canon May 9 '11 at 17:19
    
You may be right. There is a decimal.equals in there as well. I haven't used them that I recall but it seems to be appropriate. If anyone knows differently, I'd be curious as well. –  nycdan May 9 '11 at 17:24

I was investigating something similar, but with a precision instead of a margin of error and ended up writing some extensions for Float. This can easily be adapted for any type though. I've got a complicated series of comparisons and this makes it nice and readable.

/// <summary>
/// A set of extensions to allow the convenient comparison of float values based on a given precision.
/// </summary>
public static class FloatingPointExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Determines if the float value is less than or equal to the float parameter according to the defined precision.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="float1">The float1.</param>
    /// <param name="float2">The float2.</param>
    /// <param name="precision">The precision.  The number of digits after the decimal that will be considered when comparing.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool LessThan(this float float1, float float2, int precision)
    {
        return (System.Math.Round(float1 - float2, precision) < 0);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines if the float value is less than or equal to the float parameter according to the defined precision.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="float1">The float1.</param>
    /// <param name="float2">The float2.</param>
    /// <param name="precision">The precision.  The number of digits after the decimal that will be considered when comparing.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool LessThanOrEqualTo(this float float1, float float2, int precision)
    {
        return (System.Math.Round(float1 - float2, precision) <= 0);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines if the float value is greater than (>) the float parameter according to the defined precision.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="float1">The float1.</param>
    /// <param name="float2">The float2.</param>
    /// <param name="precision">The precision.  The number of digits after the decimal that will be considered when comparing.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool GreaterThan(this float float1, float float2, int precision)
    {
        return (System.Math.Round(float1 - float2, precision) > 0);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines if the float value is greater than or equal to (>=) the float parameter according to the defined precision.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="float1">The float1.</param>
    /// <param name="float2">The float2.</param>
    /// <param name="precision">The precision.  The number of digits after the decimal that will be considered when comparing.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool GreaterThanOrEqualTo(this float float1, float float2, int precision)
    {
        return (System.Math.Round(float1 - float2, precision) >= 0);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines if the float value is equal to (==) the float parameter according to the defined precision.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="float1">The float1.</param>
    /// <param name="float2">The float2.</param>
    /// <param name="precision">The precision.  The number of digits after the decimal that will be considered when comparing.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool AlmostEquals(this float float1, float float2, int precision)
    {
        return (System.Math.Round(float1 - float2, precision) == 0);
    } 
}
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