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I'm trying to implement SHA1 in Ruby and in order to do so I need to preform a left rotate through carry. The code I've written seems to work for 1 rotation, but any more than that it fails my tests, anybody know why?

class Integer
  def rotate_left(count, size)
    temp = self

    count.times do
      first_bit = (self & 2 ** size)[size]
      temp = temp << 1
      temp = temp ^ first_bit
      temp = temp ^ (2 ** (size + 1))
    end

    return temp
  end
end
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You need to add an example of your usage and what you expect. When I do 5.rotate_left(2,2) with the fixes mentioned below, I get 6. –  AShelly May 9 '11 at 18:07

3 Answers 3

I checked Wikipedia first to make sure I understood the operation. It looks as if you were losing your carry's. Also, I added the test class to make sure I was getting the right answers. I wasn't sure if you wanted to preserve the carried bits or not so I commented out the code to truncate the result. Hope this helps!

class Integer
    def rotate_left(count, size)
        temp = self
        carry = 0

        count.times do
            temp = temp << 1
            temp = temp | carry
            carry = (temp >> size) & 1
        end

        return temp # & (( 1 << size ) - 1)
    end

end

if __FILE__ == $0 then

    require 'test/unit'

    class TestRotateLeft < Test::Unit::TestCase
        def test_no_rotation
            result = 5.rotate_left(0,4)
            answer = result & 15
            carry = ( result & 16 ) >> 4
            assert_equal 5, result
            assert_equal 0, carry
        end

        def test_one_rotation
            result = 5.rotate_left(1,4)
            answer = result & 15
            carry = ( result & 16 ) >> 4
            assert_equal 10, answer
            assert_equal 0, carry
        end

        def test_first_carry
            result = 5.rotate_left(2,4)
            answer = result & 15
            carry = ( result & 16 ) >> 4
            assert_equal 4, answer
            assert_equal 1, carry
        end

        def test_shift_from_carry
            result = 5.rotate_left(3,4)
            answer = result & 15
            carry = ( result & 16 ) >> 4
            assert_equal 9, answer
            assert_equal 0, carry
        end

        def test_second_carry
            result = 5.rotate_left(4,4)
            answer = result & 15
            carry = ( result & 16 ) >> 4
            assert_equal 2, answer
            assert_equal 1, carry
        end

        def test_full_rotation
            result = 5.rotate_left(5,4)
            answer = result & 15
            carry = ( result & 16 ) >> 4
            assert_equal 5, answer
            assert_equal 0, carry
        end

    end

end
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I think @J-_-L's answer is much simpler. This version passes the tests above: def rotate_left(count=1, size=32) self << count | self >> ((size+1) - count) end –  zemoxian May 9 '11 at 21:04

what are you using for size? If you are trying to do a 4 bit rotation for example, and you set size to 4, then the first_bit calculation is getting the 5th bit:

 2**4 => 16
 16.to_s(2) => "10000"   

So the indexing is Ok. But in the inner loop, you are getting first_bit from self instead of temp. So this will only work the 1st time through.

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I was passing in a 0 based size. –  dpick May 9 '11 at 17:31
    
Wow, not sure how I missed that, thanks. That does fix 1 issue, however if I pass in 5 => 101, it will do the first rotation and end up with 011, which it then truncates to 11 and I can't do any more rotations correctly. –  dpick May 9 '11 at 17:52
    
is it possible it is using Integer#size instead of the size parameter? Try renaming the parameter to bits or something like that... –  AShelly May 9 '11 at 17:55
    
Wouldn't Integer#size always return 8 for a fixnum? –  dpick May 9 '11 at 18:00
    
Also the temp = temp ^ (2 ** (size + 1)) only works to clear the high bit if the high bit is set. Otherwise it sets the high bit. The more common way to do this is temp = temp&((2**(size+1))-1). And the more common way to write 2**n when you are doing bitwise operations is 1<<n –  AShelly May 9 '11 at 18:02

I once implemented SHA-256 in Ruby (which is using right rotate) and finally used this code:

class Integer
  def rotate(n=1)
    self >> n | self << (32 - n)
  end
end

You can modify it for left rotate:

class Integer
  def lotate(n=1)
    self << n | self >> (32 - n)
  end
end

Although it's very hard to understand... it works :)

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Thanks! That worked great. –  dpick May 9 '11 at 20:45
    
Don't you need a mask to get rid of the high bits on the left shift? Otherwise you are doing a multiply. And Ruby won't truncate on overflow, it will just return a Bignum. –  AShelly May 9 '11 at 20:48
    
Hm, I am not 100% sure... I had to cut off the high bits anyway later in the code. –  J-_-L May 9 '11 at 21:00

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