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I do

 Collections.frequency(List<String>, List<String>.get(i)) / List<String>.size()

The output for the above calculation should be (for example)

0.00631
0.0002378
0.00571

but I get 0.0, instead. How do I handle this? I keep getting 0.0 with double and float

Thanks

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4  
You're going to have to be more specific. Show some code, perhaps? –  Isaac Truett May 9 '11 at 17:28
    
Where are you getting the 0.0? Debugger, console, file? –  Pepe May 9 '11 at 17:30
    
Especially considering those are not lot of values after the decimal when looking at it in scientific notation: 6.31e-3, 2.378e-4, 5.71e-3. As-is, these values should not be causing issues, so we'll need more info. –  pickypg May 9 '11 at 17:31
2  
You are using integers to make a division check aioobe's answer –  Pepe May 9 '11 at 17:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If the values 0.00631, 0.0002378 and 0.00571 are expected results from divisions, make sure you're not doing integer divisions. That is, make sure to cast numerator or denominator to float or double.

Instead of

double fraction = someInt / someOtherInt;

you can do

double fraction = (double) someInt / someOtherInt;

In your particular case, you could try something like

(double) Collections.frequency(list, list.get(i)) / list.size();
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Use BigDecimal that does not introduce any rounding for very big or very small numbers at the cost of bigger memory consumption and slower computations. This class is a must for any financial data.

BigDecimal val = new BigDecimal("10000000000000.0002378");
System.out.println(val);
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1  
The OP has provided a bit more information, and BigDecimal seems unnecessary for what he's doing. –  ColinD May 9 '11 at 17:37

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