Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a kind of 'basics' question about php. In the example code for fgets, it has this snippet as an example of reading through a file's contents:

while (($buffer = fgets($handle, 4096)) !== false) {
    echo $buffer;
}

How is it that the statement ($buffer = fgets($handle, 4096)) can have a value? Is it a kind of assignment+evaluation of $buffer? I mean, how does it get its value? Is there a name for this? I notice its using strict comparison, so do all assignments evaluate to a boolean true or false?

If I wanted to write a function that could be treated this way, do I have to do anything special, other than return false on certain conditions?

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In PHP an assignment is an expression, i.e. it returns a value. $buffer = fgets($handle, 4096) will first assign the value to $buffer and then return the assigned value.

So, basically, you could write:

$buffer = fgets($handle, 4096);
while ($buffer !== false) {
    echo $buffer;

    $buffer = fgets($handle, 4096);
}

Here you would have the assignment on a separate line. Because in that case you need to duplicate the assignment, the assignment in the loop condition is preferred.

PS: The most common example for an assignment in a while loop is probably fetching rows from mysql:

while ($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($result)) {
    echo $row['firstname'] . ' ' . $row['lastname'];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Beat me to it ;) –  rockerest May 9 '11 at 18:01
    
So in the example code snippet, the reason it works is because fgets could return false, which would assign false as the value of $buffer, which in turn would be the result of evaluating the assignment? –  user151841 May 9 '11 at 18:04
1  
@user151841: Yep, that's exactly the reason ;) –  NikiC May 9 '11 at 18:05

Because FALSE is returned for either "no more data" or "error," the while loop will just execute until it must stop.

A more clear way of writing that would be:

$buffer = fgets($handle, 4096);
while( $buffer !== false )
{
    echo $buffer;
    $buffer = fgets($handle, 4096);
}

But that's nowhere near as clean.

share|improve this answer

When you do an assignment in PHP, the assignment returns the value that was assigned. This allows you to evaluate the assignment in conditionals or loops or other expressions.

var_dump ($var = 'test');

the result would be "test" would be displayed.

The above code example does an assignment and a test in the same operation, a kind of programmer's shorthand that's quite common. fgets() returns a line from an open file, or false if there isn't a line to return. You could do

while ($buffer !== false) {
    echo $buffer;
    $buffer = fgets($handle, 4096);
}

but you would of course have to set buffer to a non-false value before entering the loop (by doing a fgets before the loop, or assigning a value that won't get displayed but isn't false such as an empty string).

share|improve this answer

In the context of a condition (eg. while or if), (x = y) is both an assignment and an expression. It returns the value that's being assigned.

You don't need to do anything special to your functions to allow them to be used like this - it's a feature of the language.

share|improve this answer

It evaulates while fgets is not returning false. Assigment in brackets returns value that has been assigned. So ($buffer = fgets($handle, 4096)) is returning fgets value.

If there is no more data to read in the file pointer, then FALSE is returned.

Simple example:

$a = 'a';
$b = 'b';
echo ($a = $b);

Returns

b
share|improve this answer

Per the documentation, and what others have already said, it doesn't alwasy return boolean. It only returns boolean when it's done or there's an error.

From PHP Manual:

Returns a string of up to length - 1 bytes read from the file pointed to by handle.

If an error occurs, returns FALSE.

So, anyway, there's nothing special about how a method like this works, you could write your own method this way:

function increment($num) {
    if( $num < 10 ) { return ++$num; }
    return false;
}

$i=-1;
while( ($i = increment($i)) !== false ) {
    echo( $i."<br />" );
}
share|improve this answer

The === operator not only checks if a function returns something that might be seen as false (like 0, NULL, etc.) It really checks against the boolean false as you can read here: http://de.php.net/manual/en/language.operators.comparison.php

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.