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I have a file, on it's first line is the english alphabet, in a random order, after that, names. I should sort the names according to the alphabet given. My class looks something like this:

class MyCompare(){
   private:
     static map<char, int> order;
   public:
     MyCompare(string alphabet){
        //loop through the string, assign character to it's index in the map
        // order[ alphabet[i] ] = i;
     }
     bool operator()(const string s1, const string s2) {
        //compare every character using compchar, return the result
     }
     bool compchar(const char c1, const char c2){
        return order[c1]<order[c2];
     }        

}

in the main, I did something like this:

int i=0;

if (myfile.is_open()) {
    while ( myfile.good() ) {
        i++;
        getline (myfile,line);
        if(i ==1){
            MyCompare st(line);
            set<string, MyCompare> words(st);                
        }
        words.insert(line);             
    }
    myfile.close();
}

of course, this doesn't work, because the set isn't visible outside the if block. I can't come up with anything else, though ... Please advise.

share|improve this question
    
I have no idea looking at this what the code is supposed to do. –  Chris May 9 '11 at 18:05
    
There should be an operator after "operator"... –  Mike DeSimone May 9 '11 at 18:05
2  
You probably don't want a static map in your MyCompare class since you are modifying it in a non-static constructor. This not only can be confusing but will lead to threading issues. Also, this seems a lot like a homework problem (or possibly take home final as we are at that season). Is this homework? –  pstrjds May 9 '11 at 18:11
1  
I don't see how the set being invisible outside the if block is a bad thing. If myfile.is_open() is false, the set is useless, so why have it? Usually when I see someone write this, I recommend that instead of writing if(myfile.is_open()) { /* most of the function winds up here */ } they write if(!myfile.is_open()) { /* handle the error, usually by bailing out */ } which removes an indent level. This is important for clarity, by keeping error-check and error-handling code next to each other, and in some projects like the Linux kernel which limit indents to 3 levels in a function. –  Mike DeSimone May 9 '11 at 18:29
1  
I agree with pstrjds. It makes absolutely no sense to have that map as a static. The way you have it, if you create a second MyCompare object with a different order string, it will override the behavior of the first. –  Benjamin Lindley May 9 '11 at 19:02
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Read the first line, then create your set, then enter the loop.

if (myfile.is_open()) {
    getline (myfile,line);
    MyCompare st(line);
    set<string, MyCompare> words(st);
    while (getline(myfile,line)) {
        words.insert(line);
    }
    myfile.close();

    // use words here
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would suggest making a small modification to this code to make use of the comment added to the question by @Mike DeSimone - that you check for if (!myfile.is_open) { // Handle error case } and then the rest of the code does not need to be nested. –  pstrjds May 9 '11 at 20:11
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Possibly not an answer to your problem, but you should almost never test the stream status bits when controlling a loop. You want:

if (myfile.is_open()) {
    while ( getline (myfile,line) ) {
        i++;
        if(i ==1){
            MyCompare st(line);
            set<string, MyCompare> words(st);                
        }
        words.insert(line);             
    }
    myfile.close();
}
share|improve this answer
    
got it off cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/files lol –  adamors May 9 '11 at 18:07
    
@Ors That explains a lot. There is no way on Earth you are going to learn C++ from web resources. –  nbt May 9 '11 at 18:08
    
Like how the worst way to learn HTML, CSS, etc. is to go to w3schools.com, even though they rank high on Google. –  Mike DeSimone May 9 '11 at 18:22
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