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Possible Duplicate:
Regex/Javascript to transform Degrees Decimal Minutes to Decimal Degrees

I have some javascript code that converts Decimal Degree Minutes to Decimal Degrees. But something is slightly screwy and am hoping someone here will know how to fix it.

How to I get this to consistently work when a user removes the ° or has extra spaces?

With the ° character it works great:

input "77° 50.51086497"
output "77.8418477495" 

input "-113° 40.54687527"
output "-113.6757812545"

However without the ° it sometimes breaks:

NOT WORKING

input "77 50.51086497"
ouput "775.0085144161667" 

WORKING

input "-113 40.54687527"
output "-113.6757812545" 

Same thing with extra spaces:

NOT WORKING

input "77   ` ` ` ` ` ` ` `50.51086497" 
output "775.0085144161667" 

WORKING

input "-113   ` ` ` ` ` ` ` `40.54687527 "
output "-113.6757812545" 

Here is my code: Please see the JSFIDDLE TO TEST

function ddmToDeg(ddm) { 
    if (!ddm) { 
        return Number.NaN; 
    } 
    var neg= ddm.match(/(^\s?-)|(\s?[SW]\s?$)/)!=null? -1.0 : 1.0; 
    ddm= ddm.replace(/(^\s?-)|(\s?[NSEW]\s?)$/,''); 
    ddm= ddm.replace(/\s/g,''); 
    var parts=ddm.match(/(\d{1,3})[.,°d]?(\d{0,2}(?:\.\d+)?)[']?/); 
        //dms.match(/(\d{1,3})[.,°d]?(\d{0,2})[']?(\d{0,2})[.,]?(\d{0,})(?:["]|[']{2})?/);
    if (parts==null) { 
        return Number.NaN; 
    } 
    // parts: 
    // 0 : degree 
    // 1 : degree 
    // 2 : minutes 


    var d= (parts[1]?         parts[1]  : '0.0')*1.0; 
    var m= (parts[2]?         parts[2]  : '0.0')*1.0; 
    var dec= (d + (m/60.0))*neg; 
    return dec; 
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Jeff Atwood May 10 '11 at 11:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Consider re-wording this question to make it more generally applicable to others. Just solving your very specific question doesn't help anybody else. I bet if you reworded this to be a more general question about detecting presence of a token with regex you would quickly get a lot of good answers. – Marplesoft May 9 '11 at 18:16
    
ahh, good to know, thanks. – capdragon May 9 '11 at 18:40
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I answered this on the original question: Regex/Javascript to transform Degrees Decimal Minutes to Decimal Degrees

Solution posted to your fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/NJDp4/6/

dmsToDeg: function(dms) { 
        if (!dms) { 
            return Number.NaN; 
        } 
        var neg= dms.match(/(^\s?-)|(\s?[SW]\s?$)/)!=null? -1.0 : 1.0; 
        dms= dms.replace(/(^\s?-)|(\s?[NSEW]\s?)$/,''); 
    var parts=dms.match(/(\d{1,3})[.,°d ]?\s*(\d{0,2}(?:\.\d+)?)[']?/); 
        if (parts==null) { 
            return Number.NaN; 
        } 
        // parts: 
        // 0 : degree 
        // 1 : degree 
        // 2 : minutes 


        var d= (parts[1]?         parts[1]  : '0.0')*1.0; 
        var m= (parts[2]?         parts[2]  : '0.0')*1.0; 
        var dec= (d + (m/60.0))*neg; 
        return dec; 
    }

The reason this was working for "-113 40.54687527" but not for "77 50.51086497" is that the code was ripping out spaces and the sign (leaving "11340.54687527" and "7750.51086497") and then grabbing the first 3 digits to use as degrees (so "113" and "775"). I've modified this so that it no longer strips out spaces before grabbing the two numbers.

share|improve this answer
    
Is this an exact duplicate? – Jared Farrish May 9 '11 at 18:19
    
Not exactly. This question is an extension of the original, but the question here was asked in comments on the original and was answered on the original question as well (probably after this was posted). It could almost certainly be closed as an (unintentional) duplicate. – Prestaul May 9 '11 at 18:23
    
Well, I might say that's ok. As Marplesoft points out, it could use a better question title. – Jared Farrish May 9 '11 at 18:25
    
Nice work! Thanks! I appreciate it. – capdragon May 9 '11 at 18:45

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