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Can someone explain to me what syntax this SQL query matches?

SELECT DISTINCT boats.boatid
FROM boats LEFT JOIN reservations ON
reservations.boatid = boats.boatid
and (@paramFromDate <= reservations.to AND reservations.from <= @paramToDate )
WHERE reservations.to IS NULL

tables:

**boats** boatid

**reservations** reservationid, fk_boatid, from, to

The idea of the query is to get non-reserved boats for a date range marked with params. Any boat that has any part of the range covered even partially is unavailable.

How is this "and..." code there? Why is it missing something like WHERE keyword? Seems like WHERE is implicit there?

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Which table does maxprice and minprice come from? –  Joe Philllips May 9 '11 at 18:42
    
Invoices is the table –  BuzzBubba May 9 '11 at 21:23
    
Do you realize that you're checking to see if the minprice<=500 and the maxprice>=100? Why is the minprice higher than the maxprice? –  Joe Philllips May 9 '11 at 21:28
    
Since that is a simplified query. I will now rewrite that to resemble the real query more closely. –  BuzzBubba May 9 '11 at 21:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you do the JOIN you can have multiple criterion. The AND is what makes that so such that you only join when "this" AND "that" are true. You could also move that to the WHERE clause but SQL can optimize it better if it's part of the JOIN condition. Not to mention in this case, it may give different results due to the LEFT JOIN. I can't tell because I'm not sure which tables the max and minprice come from.

In short, it's part of the join condition.

SELECT DISTINCT beverages.beverageid
FROM beverages
LEFT JOIN invoices ON invoices.beverageid = beverages.beverageid AND (100 <= maxprice AND minprice <= 500)
WHERE maxprice IS NULL

(Rewrote the code so it's easier to read sensibly)

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1  
Just a small nit to pick - with the 'and' as part of the JOIN-ON expression, the check on the min-price becomes part of the limit on which invoices rows are joined. If it were in the WHERE clause, it would 'collapse' to an inner-join becuase it would exclude the 'extra' beverages rows - those without a matching invoices row. –  n8wrl May 9 '11 at 18:30
    
If I swap "AND" with WHERE and "WHERE" with OR I get very different (wrong results). –  BuzzBubba May 9 '11 at 18:31
    
@n8wrl: that's been dealt with "maxprice IS NULL", the part to get beverages that don't have any invoices I mean. –  BuzzBubba May 9 '11 at 18:34

"and..." is part of your join condition.

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The and condition applies to the join. First the join is made according to the conditions and then the WHERE is applied to the result set.

This should return nothing because it first finds the list of beverages whose maxprice is >=100 and min price is <=500 all of these returned values will have a value (not null) for maxprice and minprice. There will be no nulls left for the WHERE clause to find so it will return an empty set.

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Unless max and minprice comes from the beverages table –  Joe Philllips May 9 '11 at 18:35
    
They don't - I know what it does, but it's a JOIN version of a previously used nested select query a co-worker wrote. The point is that query returns all beverages that either: - has no invoices in the invoices table (invoice has min and max price columns and there can be multiple of invoices for a beverage item) - has invoices that has ranges inside an invoice that are out of the mentioned range: either lower than 100 or higher than 500. –  BuzzBubba May 9 '11 at 18:56

By adding the additional conditions to the LEFT JOIN, you're actually telling SQL Server to retrieve all rows from beverages and retrieve rows from invoices that contain a matching beverage where the maxprice is greater than or equal to 100 and the minprice is greater than or equal to 500 OR return a NULL row from invoices if no rows exist that satisfy the join conditions.

In this case, since you're doing SELECT DISTINCT beverage, the LEFT JOIN is most likely getting optimized out as superficial.

The final WHERE is going to remove most rows from your query.

share|improve this answer
    
I know what it does, but it's a JOIN version of a previously used nested select query a co-worker wrote. The point is that query returns all beverages that either: - has no invoices in the invoices table (invoice has min and max price columns and there can be multiple of invoices for a beverage item) - has invoices that has ranges inside an invoice that are out of the mentioned range: either lower than 100 or higher than 500. –  BuzzBubba May 9 '11 at 18:56

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