Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Apologies for the basic nature of these questions - I'm brand new to XSLT (and to Stack Overflow too).

I need to transform the following XML being returned by a Sharepoint Web service:

<GetGroupCollectionFromUser xmlns=
   "http://schemas.microsoft.com/sharepoint/soap/directory/">
   <Groups>
      <Group ID="3" Name="Group1" Description="Description" OwnerID="1" 
         OwnerIsUser="False" />
      <Group ID="15" Name="Group2" Description="Description" 
         OwnerID="12" OwnerIsUser="True" />
      <Group ID="16" Name="Group3" Description="Description" 
         OwnerID="7" OwnerIsUser="False" />
   </Groups>
</GetGroupCollectionFromUser>

into this:

<GetGroupCollectionFromUser xmlns=
   "http://schemas.microsoft.com/sharepoint/soap/directory/">
   <Groups>
      <Group Name="Group1" />
      <Group Name="Group2" />
      <Group Name="Group3" />
   </Groups>
</GetGroupCollectionFromUser>

Basically, I need to drop all the attributes for each Group element except Name. After a lot of research and tinkering, and notably dropping the namespace declaration from the original XML, I've come up with something that gets me almost exactly what I need:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

<xsl:output method="xml" encoding="utf-8" indent="no"/>

<xsl:template match="/GetGroupCollectionFromUser">
    <xsl:copy>                  
        <xsl:apply-templates select="Groups" />
    </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="Groups">
    <xsl:copy>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="Group" />
    </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template> 

<xsl:template match="Group">
    <xsl:copy>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="@Name" />
    </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

However, instead of a Name attribute, the above gives me the value of the Name attribute inserted as text into the Group element, like so:

<GetGroupCollectionFromUser>
    <Groups>
        <Group>Group1</Group>
        <Group>Group2</Group>
        <Group>Group3</Group>
    </Groups>
</GetGroupCollectionFromUser>

This will ultimately be consumed by a third-party application that's expecting attribute-centric XML. I'm sure I'm missing something embarrassingly obvious, but no matter what I do with it I can't seem to pull in just the Name attribute. Two questions:

How do I alter the XSLT to return a Name attribute for each Group element, instead of its value as text?

And, how do I handle the namespace properly? When I've included it in the XSLT, trying several methods based on examples I've found here and elsewhere on the web, I get nothing at all back.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

share|improve this question
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for the shortest correct solution that is based on one of the most fundamental and powerful XSLT design patterns. –  Dimitre Novatchev May 10 '11 at 3:42
    
Did you see my answer and was it useful to you? –  Dimitre Novatchev May 10 '11 at 13:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is possibly one of the shortest transformations that correctly produces the wanted result:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="@*[not(name()='Name')]"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When applied on the provided XML document:

<GetGroupCollectionFromUser xmlns=
"http://schemas.microsoft.com/sharepoint/soap/directory/">
    <Groups>
        <Group ID="3" Name="Group1" Description="Description" OwnerID="1"           OwnerIsUser="False" />
        <Group ID="15" Name="Group2" Description="Description"           OwnerID="12" OwnerIsUser="True" />
        <Group ID="16" Name="Group3" Description="Description"           OwnerID="7" OwnerIsUser="False" />
    </Groups>
</GetGroupCollectionFromUser>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<GetGroupCollectionFromUser xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sharepoint/soap/directory/">
   <Groups>
      <Group Name="Group1"/>
      <Group Name="Group2"/>
      <Group Name="Group3"/>
   </Groups>
</GetGroupCollectionFromUser>

Explanation:

  1. The identity rule (template) copies every node "as-is".

  2. There is just one template that overrides the identity rule. It matches any attribute whose name is not "Name". The body of the template is empty and this results in any matched attribute not copied.

Using and overriding the identity rule is the most fundamental and powerful XSLT design pattern. Read about it here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much! And for the identity reference, that's going to come in handy. Am I correct in assuming that node()|@* is returning all nodes plus all attributes? And I read @*[not(name()='Name')] as "get all attributes not having the name Name," yet it actually does the opposite? Again, apologies for the basic questions. –  rlg May 10 '11 at 13:47
    
@rlg: node()|@* is an XPath expression (in this case a match pattern). It selects any child::node() or any attribute::* of the current node. This means: all attributes and all element, text-nodes, processing instruction and comment nodes -- children. –  Dimitre Novatchev May 10 '11 at 14:33
    
@rlg: @*[not(name()='Name')] selects any attribute, whose name is not "Name". This means that the template having this match-pattern is selected to process all such attributes. The processing is null -- so they are not copied to the output. –  Dimitre Novatchev May 10 '11 at 14:35

The way to handle these situations is by overriding the Identity Transform:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" 
    xmlns:msft="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sharepoint/soap/directory/">
    <xsl:template match="@*|node()">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()" />
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>
    <xsl:template match="msft:Group">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@Name" />
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Output:

<GetGroupCollectionFromUser
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sharepoint/soap/directory/">
    <Groups>
        <Group Name="Group1" />
        <Group Name="Group2" />
        <Group Name="Group3" />
    </Groups>
</GetGroupCollectionFromUser>

Note that the output is properly namespaced.

This solution is preferred because of its simplicity and flexibility. All nodes and attributes are copied as-is, unless an override exists that specifies an alternate behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 It looks very powerfull (esoteric to me), but giving it a try it copies all the attributes in the output. Where msft is coming from? –  Emiliano Poggi May 9 '11 at 20:08
    
The source XML specifies a namespace: xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sharepoint/soap/directory/". This needs to be accounted for in the XSLT. See the stylesheet element for how to assign a name -- in this case msft -- to the namespace found in the source doc, so that you can properly refer to the element later. –  lwburk May 9 '11 at 20:20
    
ok, but in your solution all the attributes are still copied to the output. –  Emiliano Poggi May 9 '11 at 20:27
    
@empo - No, they're not. Are you using the OP's exact input and my exact stylesheet? My guess is you're not accounting for namespaces. –  lwburk May 9 '11 at 21:11
    
@empo - Note that I decided to update to use xsl:copy, but, either way, this does not output all attributes. –  lwburk May 9 '11 at 21:19

I think that it becomes easier for you if you don't use xsl:copy here. Try this:

<xsl:template match="Groups/*">
 <xsl:element name="Group">
     <xsl:attribute name="Name">
      <xsl:value-of select="@Name" />
     </xsl:attribute>
 </xsl:element>
</xsl:template>

Answer to second question is a FAQ. Declare the namespace and use the declared prefix in your xsl. Final solution:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" 
    xmlns:myns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sharepoint/soap/director/"
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

 <xsl:output method="xml" encoding="utf-8" indent="no"/>

 <xsl:template match="/myns:GetGroupCollectionFromUser">
  <Groups>                 
    <xsl:apply-templates select="myns:Groups" />
  </Groups>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="myns:Groups/*">
  <xsl:element name="Group">
     <xsl:attribute name="Name">
      <xsl:value-of select="@Name" />
     </xsl:attribute>
  </xsl:element>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
This only returns the last group for me, though I admit I don't know too much xslt so I might be missing something. I'm testing using xslt.online-toolz.com/tools/xslt-transformation.php –  Kobi May 9 '11 at 19:20
    
Ops, I blame myself...now you have the simplest solution. –  Emiliano Poggi May 9 '11 at 20:05
    
@empo - Your first template does not match any elements in the source document due to not respecting namespaces. Your complete stylesheet example does not produce the requested output. –  lwburk May 9 '11 at 21:25
    
@Iwburk: I was just giving hints, that's not so nice and ambiguous, true. You have the complete solution now. –  Emiliano Poggi May 9 '11 at 22:02
2  
@Dimitre: I like your expression convoluted. Sorry for not being the master of XSLT. –  Emiliano Poggi May 10 '11 at 7:09

This seems to work for me:

<xsl:template match="Group">
    <xsl:copy>
        <xsl:attribute name="Name">
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@Name" />
        </xsl:attribute>
    </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>
share|improve this answer
    
Completely incorrect: Notice the default namespace. Also, the output loses the top element. –  Dimitre Novatchev May 10 '11 at 3:36
    
@Dimitre - This isn't a whole solution - It is based on the OP's solution, replacing only the Group template. –  Kobi May 10 '11 at 5:55
    
This template doesn't match any node -- due to the default namespace. No way this could produce a non-empty result. You have not even tested and verified that your proposed solution really produces the wanted result. –  Dimitre Novatchev May 10 '11 at 6:00
    
@Dimitre - That is unfair. I actually did test it. It is working without the namespace (as the OP said his/her works "After [...] dropping the namespace declaration from the original XML"), though that isn't optimal as well. –  Kobi May 10 '11 at 6:39
    
The OP said that he couldn't make his transformation work in the case of the default namespace -- not that he wanted a solution without namespace. –  Dimitre Novatchev May 10 '11 at 13:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.