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Okay - I'm sure this has been answered here before but I can't find it....

My problem: I have a list of lists with this composition

0.2 A

0.1 A

0.3 A

0.3 B

0.2 C

0.5 C

My goal is to output the following:

0.6 A

0.3 B

0.7 C

In other words, I need to merge the data from multiple lines together.

Here's the code I'm using:

unique_percents = []

for line in percents:
    new_percent = float(line[0])
    for inner_line in percents:
        if line[1] == inner_line[1]:
           new_percent += float(inner_line[0])
        else:
            temp = []
            temp.append(new_percent)
            temp.append(line[1])
            unique_percents.append(temp)
            break

I think it should work, but it's not adding the percents up and still has the duplicates. Perhaps I'm not understanding how "break" works?

I'll also take suggestions of a better loop structure or algorithm to use. Thanks, David.

share|improve this question
1  
Is there a dictionary in Python? That's what I'd use if it was C#. –  Michael Todd May 9 '11 at 19:49
3  
Is it finals season or something? –  Blindy May 9 '11 at 19:49
1  
I would use a dictionary here. –  Hamish Grubijan May 9 '11 at 19:50
    
Look up Python dictionaries. They are exactly what you need here. –  Chinmay Kanchi May 9 '11 at 19:51
    
Thanks, everybody. I do "know" about dictionaries, but I just didn't see how I would use them in this case. The MANY nice answers are helping. Oh, and Blindy, I'm self-teaching myself. Hence the very stupid questions. –  David M May 9 '11 at 20:56

11 Answers 11

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You want to use a dict, but collections.defaultdict can come in really handy here so that you don't have to worry about whether the key exists in the dict or not -- it just defaults to 0.0:

import collections

lines = [[0.2, 'A'], [0.1, 'A'], [0.3, 'A'], [0.3, 'B'], [0.2, 'C'], [0.5, 'C']]
amounts = collections.defaultdict(float)
for amount, letter in lines:
    amounts[letter] += amount

for letter, amount in sorted(amounts.iteritems()):
    print amount, letter
share|improve this answer
    
Cool! That's what I love Python for, it never stops surprising you :) (P.S. didn't know about collections.defaultdict) –  BasicWolf May 9 '11 at 20:19

Try this out:

result = {}
for line in percents:
    value, key = line
    result[key] = result.get(key, 0) + float(value)
share|improve this answer
total = {}
data = [('0.1', 'A'), ('0.2', 'A'), ('.3', 'B'), ('.4', 'B'), ('-10', 'C')]
for amount, key in data:
    total[key] = total.get(key, 0.0) + float(amount)

for key, amount in total.items():
    print key, amount
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like the get() call with default value. Nice to be able to keep it on one line. –  ralphtheninja May 9 '11 at 20:10

Since all of the letter grades are grouped together, you can use itertools.groupby (and if not, just sort the list ahead of time to make them so):

data = [
    [0.2, 'A'],
    [0.1, 'A'],
    [0.3, 'A'],
    [0.3, 'B'],
    [0.2, 'C'],
    [0.5, 'C'],
]

from itertools import groupby

summary = dict((k, sum(i[0] for i in items)) 
                for k,items in groupby(data, key=lambda x:x[1]))

print summary

Gives:

{'A': 0.60000000000000009, 'C': 0.69999999999999996, 'B': 0.29999999999999999}
share|improve this answer
    
This is neat, how about sorting this? –  Hamish Grubijan May 9 '11 at 20:12
    
Using operator: key=operator.itemgetter(1) –  riza May 10 '11 at 5:43

If you have a list of lists like this: [ [0.2, A], [0.1, A], ...] (in fact it looks like a list of tuples :)

res_dict = {}

for pair in lst:
    letter = pair[1]
    val = pair[0]
    try:
        res_dict[letter] += val
    except KeyError:
        res_dict[letter] = val

res_lst = [(val, letter) for letter, val in res_dict] # note, a list of tuples!
share|improve this answer

Using collections.defaultdict to tally values (assuming text data in d):

>>> s=collections.defaultdict(float)
>>> for ln in d:
...     v,k=ln.split()
...     s[k] += float(v)
>>> s
defaultdict(<type 'float'>, {'A': 0.60000000000000009, 'C': 0.69999999999999996, 'B': 0.29999999999999999})
>>> ["%s %s" % (v,k) for k,v in s.iteritems()]
['0.6 A', '0.7 C', '0.3 B']
>>> 
share|improve this answer
    
how about sorting this by a b c ? –  Hamish Grubijan May 9 '11 at 20:11
    
Use OrderedDict - docs.python.org/library/… –  gimel May 10 '11 at 9:43

If you are using Python 3.1 or newer, you can use collections.Counter. Also I suggest using decimal.Decimal instead of floats:

# Counter requires python 3.1 and newer
from collections import Counter
from decimal import Decimal

lines = ["0.2 A", "0.1 A", "0.3 A", "0.3 B", "0.2 C", "0.5 C"]
results = Counter()
for line in lines:
    percent, label = line.split()
    results[label] += Decimal(percent)
print(results)

The result is:

Counter({'C': Decimal('0.7'), 'A': Decimal('0.6'), 'B': Decimal('0.3')})

share|improve this answer

This is verbose, but works:

# Python 2.7
lines = """0.2 A
0.1 A
0.3 A
0.3 B
0.2 C
0.5 C"""

lines = lines.split('\n')
#print(lines)
pctg2total = {}
thing2index = {}
index = 0
for line in lines:
    pctg, thing = line.split()
    pctg = float(pctg)
    if thing not in thing2index:
        thing2index[thing] = index
        index = index + 1
        pctg2total[thing] = pctg
    else:
        pctg2total[thing] = pctg2total[thing] + pctg
output = ((pctg2total[thing], thing) for thing in pctg2total)
# Let's sort by the first occurrence.
output = list(sorted(output, key = lambda thing: thing2index[thing[1]]))
print(output)

>>> 
[(0.60000000000000009, 'A'), (0.29999999999999999, 'B'), (0.69999999999999996, 'C')]
share|improve this answer
letters = {}
for line in open("data", "r"):
    lineStrip = line.strip().split()
    percent = float(lineStrip[0])
    letter = lineStrip[1]
    if letter in letters:
        letters[letter] = percent + letters[letter]
    else:
        letters[letter] = percent

for letter, percent in letters.items():
    print letter, percent

A 0.6
C 0.7
B 0.3
share|improve this answer

Lets say we have this

data =[(b, float(a)) for a,b in 
    (line.split() for line in
        """
        0.2 A
        0.1 A
        0.3 A
        0.3 B
        0.2 C
        0.5 C""".splitlines()
        if line)]
print data 
# [('A', 0.2), ('A', 0.1), ('A', 0.3), ('B', 0.3), ('C', 0.2), ('C', 0.5)]

You can now just go though this and sum

counter = {}
for letter, val in data:
    if letter in counter:
        counter[letter]+=val
    else:
        counter[letter]=val

print counter.items() 

Or group values together and use sum:

from itertools import groupby
# you want the name and the sum of the values
print [(name, sum(value for k,value in grp)) 
    # from each group
    for name, grp in 
    # where the group name of a item `p` is given by `p[0]`
    groupby(sorted(data), key=lambda p:p[0])]
share|improve this answer
>>> from itertools import groupby, imap
>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> data = [['0.2', 'A'], ['0.1', 'A'], ['0.3', 'A'], ['0.3', 'B'], ['0.2', 'C'], ['0.5', 'C']]
>>> # data = sorted(data, key=itemgetter(1))
... 
>>> for k, g in groupby(data, key=itemgetter(1)):
...     print sum(imap(float, imap(itemgetter(0), g))), k
... 
0.6 A
0.3 B
0.7 C
>>> 
share|improve this answer

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