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I have an AJAX request that can have two possible outcomes:

  1. The server responds with a message which I should place in a <div>
  2. The server responds with an HTML page, in this case I need to substitute current page with a new one and change the address (the client knows the address before a request).

What would be the solution if I have the AJAX request that needs to handle both of these cases?

 url = "http://example.com"
 ajax.request(callback)

 function callback(response) {
     if (case2(response)) {
           history.pushState({}, "New page", url);
           document.innerHTML = response
     } else {
            updateDiv(response)
     }
 }

I'm interested in a correct way to implement the first branch, or if the server can somehow compose a headers that will make browser to handle a response as a usual HTTP response and update a page location and content, something like redirect with given content.

I understand that the server can return a link instead of a page, but in this case one additional stage will be needed on a client - redirect and then populating the new page on the server.

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1  
What do you mean when you say, "whole html page with new address". Can we get an example of the content it would send back on that specific request? –  slandau May 9 '11 at 20:09
    
$(document).innerHTML = the_response;? –  Marc B May 9 '11 at 20:11
    
+1 @slandau. @Nutella Can you please post some code and possibly clarify the question? –  pixelbobby May 9 '11 at 20:12
1  
Why not just detect the response and redirect, why refresh the whole page including the address? –  Matt May 9 '11 at 20:12
20  
Sometimes you have a hammer and everything looks like a nail. Right now, your hammer is ajax, and you think everything needs to be done with ajax. Stop, slow down, don't do this, and please think of the children. –  Incognito May 16 '11 at 23:26
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6 Answers 6

Quite frankly, I think that approach is basically broken by design. You shouldn't have to make that decision at that place. For example, the ajax response could only signal that a whole new page should be loaded and the new content then be generated on a second (non-ajax) request to a new URL.

In case you're forced to take the way you already go, and provided the response content is not very large, you could try Javascript-URIs. Basically, an URI in the form of javascript:"string" will load a new page which that string is the source code for. So, if response already is a string, just assigning javascript:response to window.location.href should suffice. Maybe you have to do some escaping beforehand. And I don't know, how cross-browser-compatible this approach is.

<a href="javascript:response">load</a>

is also possible.

A variant of this is building the URL not with the variable name, but with the actual string data. Like

function source2url(src) {
    // make valid javascript string from source text
    var esc1 = src
        .replace(/\\/g, '\\\\')
        .replace(/\'/g, '\\\'')
        .replace(/\x0A/g, '\\x0A')
        .replace(/\x0D/g, '\\x0D');

    // make valid url from that
    return "javascript:'" + encodeURIComponent(esc1) + "'";
}

window.location.href = source2url(response);

This will, of course, generate pretty large URIs. And you'll always have the Javascript-URI in the address bar.

UPDATE

A similar approach is to use base64 encoding in a data URI. The Wikipedia entry explains how it works, including a javascript example. However, you'd have to base64-encode the content somehow. (Note: You can use data URIs with or without the base64 encoding. You have to see what gives you shorter URIs for your specific content.)

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Totally agree on the fact that the server should send only a signal about what the client should do: display provided data or load a new URL. The server could simply echo some JSON encoded string, which could be of the form: {"type":"url","content":"ULR/to/my/new/page"} or: {"type":"data","content":"Content to display somewhere in my page"} Then the client could do what's most appropriate, according to the "type" property. –  PJP May 16 '11 at 10:43
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I had a similar issue once. A full error page was returned instead of a simple HTML snippet. We eventually fixed this by changing the logic, but here is one of the solutions I found:

document.open();
document.write(responseText);
document.close();

The reason we abandoned this is that on IE there were some problems. I didn't loose any time to investigate why, but it threw an 'Access denied' exception when attempting to write the string. I think there were some <meta> tags that confused IE, or maybe conditional comments, I'm not sure. (It worked when I used some simple pages...)

Bottom line is: you shouldn't have to do this, but if there is nothing else you can do (like returning an url string) the code above might work.

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It's really easy if the response is valid XML.

var new_doc = (new DOMParser).parseFromString(response, "application/xml");
document.replaceChild(document.adoptNode(new_doc.doctype), document.doctype);
document.replaceChild(document.adoptNode(new_doc.documentElement), document.documentElement);
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Since the request is for an updated answer, here's my solution using HTML5's History API with jQuery. It should run easily by combining the PHP and HTML parts into one file.

My solution allows for AJAX to return the following:

  1. A message through AJAX, which updates a <div> container.
  2. A URL, which causes the browser to redirect to the URL
  3. A complete HTML page, which calls the History API's history.pushState() to add the current URL to the browser's history and replaces the entire HTML on the page with the HTML returned from AJAX.

PHP

This is just a sample of what the PHP script will need to return when it is invoked via AJAX. It shows how to encode flags to determine whether the AJAX call should update the container or load a new page, and how to return its result via JSON through json_encode. For completeness, I named this script test.php.

<?php
// Random messages to return
$messages = array(
    'Stack Overflow',
    'Error Message',
    'Testing'
);

// If the page was requested via AJAX
if( isset( $_POST['ajax']))
{
    $response = array(
        'redirect' => // Flag to redirect
            ( rand() % 2 == 0) ? true : false, 
        'load_html' => // Flag to load HTML or do URL redirect
            ( rand() % 2 == 0) ? true : false,
        'html' => // Returned HTML
            '<html><head><title>AJAX Loaded Title</title></head><body>It works!</body></html>',
        'title' => 'History API previous title',
        'message' => // Random message
            $messages[ (rand() % count( $messages)) ]
    );
    echo json_encode( $response);
    exit;
}

JS

Since I am using jQuery, lets start with that. The following submits an AJAX POST to the server, to the above PHP script at URL test.php. Note that it also sets the POST parameter ajax to be true, enabling the PHP script to detect that it received an AJAX request. The dataType field tells jQuery that the server's response will be in JSON, and that it should decode that JSON to a JSON object in the response callback. Finally, the success callback, which is fired when the AJAX response is successfully received, determines what to do based on the flags sent from the server.

$.ajax({
    type: 'POST',
    url: "/test.php",
    data: {ajax : true},
    dataType: "json",
    success: function( json) {
        if( json.redirect) {
            if( json.load_html) {   
                // If the History API is available  
                if( !(typeof history.pushState === 'undefined')) {
                    history.pushState( 
                        { url: redirect_url, title: document.title}, 
                        document.title, // Can also use json.title to set previous page title on server
                        redirect_url
                    );
                }
                // Output the HTML
                document.open();
                document.write( json.html);
                document.close();
            }
            else {
                window.location = redirect_url;
            }
        }
        else {
            $('#message').html( json.message);
        }
    },
});

HTML

Here is the complete HTML source of my tested file. I tested it in FF4 - FF8. Note that jQuery provides the ready method to prevent the JS from executing until the DOM is loaded. I've also used Google's hosting of jQuery, so you do not need to upload a copy of jQuery to your server to test this.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.0/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <title>Default Page</title>

    <script type="text/javascript"">        
        $( document).ready( function() {
            $('#ajax_link').click(  function() {
                var redirect_url = "/test.php";
                $.ajax({
                    type: 'POST',
                    url: "/test.php",
                    data: {ajax : true},
                    dataType: "json",
                    success: function( json) {
                        if( json.redirect) {
                            if( json.load_html) {   
                                // If the History API is available  
                                if( !(typeof history.pushState === 'undefined')) {
                                    history.pushState( 
                                        { url: redirect_url, title: document.title}, 
                                        document.title, // Can also use json.title to set previous page title on server
                                        redirect_url
                                    );
                                }
                                document.open();
                                document.write( json.html);
                                document.close();
                            }
                            else {
                                window.location = redirect_url;
                            }
                        }
                        else {
                            $('#message').html( json.message);
                        }
                    },
                });
            })
        });
    </script>
</head>

<body>
    <div id="message">The default contents of the message</div>
    <a id="ajax_link" href="#">Fire AJAX</a>

</body>
</html>
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as T-Bull say... the whole process is wrong here....

you simply are over-complicating things and you know that infact:

I understand that the server can return a link instead of a page, but in this case one additional stage will be needed on a client - redirect and then populating the new page on the server.

stop complicating and start do it well...

  1. Client open the page first time, so, track it $_SESSION['tmp_client_id'] = 'client_'.session_id(); obviously is better if the client is already subscribed, anyway, put stuff in temp table OR into another session var etc...
  2. Client fill in the form;
  3. Client submit the form;
  4. Make the AJAX request;
  5. Store $_POST variable inside tmp_client_tbl with it's unique tmp_client_id OR just $_SESSION['client_'.session_id()] = json_encode($_POST);
  6. Outcome #1 ? display message in a </div>
  7. Outcome #2 ? refresh page and check if( isset($_SESSION['client_'.session_id()])) { if so let's display the form again with filled fields: } else { display empty form;
  8. SELECT * FROM tmp_client_tbl WHERE tmp_client_id = '{$_SESSION['tmp_client_id']}' OR json_decode($_SESSION['client_'.session_id()]);
  9. $form_data = $mysql_rows; OR $json_array;
  10. foreach($form_data as $name => $value) { echo "<input name='$name' value='$value' />" } in a ninja way that assume you have such kind of form builder array where $form = array('text' => array('name','lastname'), 'select' => array('countries'), ... ), OR simply by <input name='lastname' value='{$lastname}' /> where the fields values are pre-polutated with empty vars;
  11. time elapsed, error occurred, browser closed? session_destroy(); or unset($_SESSION['client_'.session_id()]);
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Was this intended as irony? "Your approach is too complicated: here's an 11 step simpler solution." –  Adam Donahue Feb 12 at 16:22
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With new address? That's not what AJAX does. Redirect to the new URL. At most, you'd replace everything in the <body> tag, never the entire <html> document.

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