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I want to use default to reset my ary when I need to. But I can't figure out how to not have default's values changed when ary's values change.

> default = {"a"=>[], "b"=>[], "c"=>[]}
=> {"a"=>[], "b"=>[], "c"=>[]} 

> ary = default.clone
=> {"a"=>[], "b"=>[], "c"=>[]} 

> ary["a"] << "foo"
=> ["foo"] 

> default
=> {"a"=>["foo"], "b"=>[], "c"=>[]} 
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Can I ask why you're doing this? –  Andrew Grimm May 9 '11 at 23:51
    
It's basically a list of statistics that are assigned to different states, the states being the keys. I periodically want to reset the list of statistics but keep all of the states intact. –  Jeremy Smith May 10 '11 at 1:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

What you've discovered here is that Hash#clone only does a shallow clone, that is it only replicates itself but not the objects that are referenced within it.

There are a number of "deep clone" gems that address this specific problem, or you can write your own to work around it:

class Hash
  def deep_clone
    Hash[collect { |k,v| [ k, v.respond_to?(:deep_clone) : v.deep_clone : v ] }]
  end
end

class Array
  def deep_clone
    collect { |v| v.respond_to?(:deep_clone) : v.deep_clone : v }
  end
end

This will let you clone arbitrary Hash and Array objects as required.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help, but I get syntax errors regarding the respond_to?(:clone) statement. –  Jeremy Smith May 9 '11 at 20:56
    
That just checks if the object in question supports the deep_clone method before calling it, as you can't clone things like numbers or true and false among other things. The only thing you'll need to deep clone in practice is container-type objects. –  tadman May 9 '11 at 20:58

Both clone and dup create a shallow copy of your object, which results in this behaviour. I'm not sure what the proper way to achieve a deep copy is, but instead of:

ary = default.clone

Try:

ary = Marshal.load(Marshal.dump(default))

This is taken from a live 2.3.8 environment on ruby 1.8.7

share|improve this answer
    
Marshal can't handle everything you throw at it, so be careful. Plus this has to be one of the most expensive ways to perform this sort of thing. –  tadman May 9 '11 at 20:57
    
Which is why I said I wasn't sure what the proper way to do it was. I like your suggestion as a more case-specific solution, so it got my upvote ;) –  Jaap Haagmans May 9 '11 at 21:13
class Object
  def deep_clone
    Marshal::load(Marshal.dump(self))
  end
end

default = {"a"=>[], "b"=>[], "c"=>[]}
ary = default.deep_clone
ary["a"] << "foo"
default {"a"=>[], "b"=>[], "c"=>[]}
share|improve this answer
    
Odd that you would use the :: notation for one method and . for another, but +1 overall. –  Phrogz May 9 '11 at 22:59
    
That you're able to call methods with :: always struck me as peculiar and confusing. –  tadman May 10 '11 at 0:26

A way to do this is as follows:

ary = Marshal.load(Marshal.dump(default)) 
share|improve this answer

clone only does shallow copies, which is why cloning your hash still keeps everything pointed at the same nested arrays.

You can avoid this through the Marshal class by dumping and then loading in the object values:

> default = {"a" => [], "b" => [], "c" => []}
=> {"a"=>[], "b"=>[], "c"=>[]} 
> ary = Marshal.load(Marshal.dump(default))
=> {"a"=>[], "b"=>[], "c"=>[]} 
> ary["a"] << "foo"
=> ["foo"]
> default
=> {"a"=>[], "b"=>[], "c"=>[]} 
share|improve this answer

Depending on what you want to do, a simpler alternative to writing a deep clone method might be to write a method that creates a new default array every time it's called:

def default
  {"a"=>[], "b"=>[], "c"=>[]}
end

ary = default #=> {"a"=>[], "b"=>[], "c"=>[]}

ary["a"] << "foo" #=> {"a"=>["foo"], "b"=>[], "c"=>[]}

default #=> {"a"=>[], "b"=>[], "c"=>[]}

Of course, if the contents of your default hash changes over the course of the program this won't work and you'll have to look into the cloning or marshalling techniques, but if the contents are fixed this might be a more straightforward solution.

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