Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am "converting" a large (~1.6GB) CSV file and inserting specific fields of the CSV into a SQLite database. Essentially my code looks like:

import csv, sqlite3

conn = sqlite3.connect( "path/to/file.db" )
conn.text_factory = str  #bugger 8-bit bytestrings
cur = conn.cur()
cur.execute('CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS mytable (field2 VARCHAR, field4 VARCHAR)')

reader = csv.reader(open(filecsv.txt, "rb"))
for field1, field2, field3, field4, field5 in reader:
  cur.execute('INSERT OR IGNORE INTO mytable (field2, field4) VALUES (?,?)', (field2, field4))

Everything works as I expect it to with the exception... IT TAKES AN INCREDIBLE AMOUNT OF TIME TO PROCESS. Am I coding it incorrectly? Is there a better way to achieve a higher performance and accomplish what I'm needing (simply convert a few fields of a CSV into SQLite table)?

**EDIT -- I tried directly importing the csv into sqlite as suggested but it turns out my file has commas in fields (e.g. "My title, comma"). That's creating errors with the import. It appears there are too many of those occurrences to manually edit the file...

any other thoughts??**

share|improve this question
1  
It's a big file. How long does it take? –  Blender May 9 '11 at 20:58
    
How many duplicate records are there? If there are a lot, it would probably be faster to keep a local set of records that have already been inserted, and skip the call to the SQL entirely for the duplicates. –  kindall May 9 '11 at 21:06
    
Here are some MySQL bulk load speed tips. –  kindall May 9 '11 at 21:52
    
What operating system and Python version are you using? –  Cristian Ciupitu May 9 '11 at 23:51
1  
"It appears there are too many of those occurrences to manually edit the file..". Let's think. Too many to change manually? If only you had a programming language that would allow you to write a program to reformat a CSV file into a TAB-delimited file. Any ideas what language could be used to write a program like that? –  S.Lott May 10 '11 at 1:10

4 Answers 4

It's possible to import the CSV directly:

sqlite> .separator ","
sqlite> .import filecsv.txt mytable

http://www.sqlite.org/cvstrac/wiki?p=ImportingFiles

share|improve this answer
    
+1: And. It still may take an incredibly long time to process. –  S.Lott May 9 '11 at 21:02
1  
"blah blah, blah","123" causes problems... thoughts around this? –  user735304 May 9 '11 at 23:50
    
Doesn't seem like there's a built-in way of escaping by default. Also, the quotes will be literals within the string. It might make sense to change the text using a CSV parse and outputting with a different separator but that might defeat the purpose of using the import tool in the first place. –  fengb May 10 '11 at 1:32

Chris is right - use transactions; divide the data into chunks and then store it.

"... Unless already in a transaction, each SQL statement has a new transaction started for it. This is very expensive, since it requires reopening, writing to, and closing the journal file for each statement. This can be avoided by wrapping sequences of SQL statements with BEGIN TRANSACTION; and END TRANSACTION; statements. This speedup is also obtained for statements which don't alter the database." - Source: http://web.utk.edu/~jplyon/sqlite/SQLite_optimization_FAQ.html

"... there is another trick you can use to speed up SQLite: transactions. Whenever you have to do multiple database writes, put them inside a transaction. Instead of writing to (and locking) the file each and every time a write query is issued, the write will only happen once when the transaction completes." - Source: How Scalable is SQLite?

import csv, sqlite3, time

def chunks(data, rows=10000):
    """ Divides the data into 10000 rows each """

    for i in xrange(0, len(data), rows):
        yield data[i:i+rows]


if __name__ == "__main__":

    t = time.time()

    conn = sqlite3.connect( "path/to/file.db" )
    conn.text_factory = str  #bugger 8-bit bytestrings
    cur = conn.cur()
    cur.execute('CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS mytable (field2 VARCHAR, field4 VARCHAR)')

    csvData = csv.reader(open(filecsv.txt, "rb"))

    divData = chunks(csvData) # divide into 10000 rows each

    for chunk in divData:
        cur.execute('BEGIN TRANSACTION')

        for field1, field2, field3, field4, field5 in chunk:
            cur.execute('INSERT OR IGNORE INTO mytable (field2, field4) VALUES (?,?)', (field2, field4))

        cur.execute('COMMIT')

    print "\n Time Taken: %.3f sec" % (time.time()-t) 
share|improve this answer
    
Another user following this code ran into a problem trying to use len() with their CSV reader: stackoverflow.com/questions/18062694/… –  rutter Aug 5 '13 at 16:39

As it's been said (Chris and Sam), transactions do improve a lot insert performance.

Please, let me recommend another option, to use a suite of Python utilities to work with CSV, csvkit.

To install:

pip install csvkit

To solve your problem

csvsql --db sqlite:///path/to/file.db --insert --table mytable filecsv.txt
share|improve this answer

Try using transactions.

begin    
insert 50,000 rows    
commit

That will commit data periodically rather than once per row.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.