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I am making an app that uses unlimited strength cryptography (larger keys, etc). For my development, I needed to modify the JDK in order to use these as described here and here.

What are my options for distributing the app? One method is to distribute a custom JRE with the modified policy files.

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Are you asking 1) whether your country's export restrictions would prevent you from distributing your app, or 2) if import restrictions in the countries of your users would prevent them from obtaining your app, or 3) whether Oracle licensing restrictions would prevent you from distributing an altered JRE? Or something else altogether? – erickson May 10 '11 at 0:17
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I am asking that assuming export restrictions (mine, users') allow them, what is the easiest way for them to use the software, without being an expert in Java. – Jus12 May 10 '11 at 1:32
    
To be honest, I don't see the point of these restrictions. Anyone with knowledge of programming and cryptography can program their own algorithms. As a side note, it is possible to distribute a full unrestricted JRE, bypassing all policies. – Jus12 May 10 '11 at 1:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In general, users will be running other cryptographic applications in their JRE. They may already have a suitable JRE. As a user, I wouldn't want to install a new copy just for your application.

I'd suggest giving them instructions to install the unlimited strength jurisdiction files, or creating a tool to install them, rather than trying to distribute an entire JRE.

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asking the users to install is not a good option... I might look at making an installer.. – Jus12 May 10 '11 at 4:19

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