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I'm wanting to run some test executables with a perl script, parse their STDOUT, and return an exit value depending on what the STDOUT contained. I'm not very familiar with perl, so it's a been a bit tough.

The problem I'm running into is ensuring that my perl script receives whatever output it can even if the test executables crash or hang.

At the moment, I'm using alarm to time out. If it hangs, I'd like to just take whatever data I can and continue onwards to parsing. Unfortunately, with my current execution method, if it hangs I get no data and the zombie process lives forever.

My (probably naive) version of getting the test output is as so.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @output;

eval {
   local $SIG{ALRM} = sub {die "alarm\n"};
   alarm 15;
   @output = `testExecutable`;
   alarm 0;
};

if ($@) {
  die unless $@ eq "alarm\n";
  print "timed out\n";
}
else {
  print "didn't time out\n";
}

print @output;

Basically, I need to execute the testExecutable in a way that will allow me to access any data it's outputted before the alarm goes off, and then kill the testExecutable process in my alarm handler.

If necessary, I can modify the test executables. Looking around, it seems buffering might be of some concern.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You problem is that using the backquote operator only populates your perl variable upon completion. So instead you should read from a perl pipe. So something like this:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @output;

eval {
    local $SIG{ALRM} = sub {die "alarm\n"};
    alarm 15;
    open my $pipe_handle, '-|', 'testExecutable' or die "open error: $!";
    while (my $line = <$pipe_handle>) {
        push @output, $line;
    }
    close $pipe_handle;
    alarm 0;
};

if ($?) {
    print "testProgram failed\n";
} elsif ($@) {
    die unless $@ eq "alarm\n";
    print "timed out\n";
} else {
    print "didn't time out\n";
}

print @output;

Keep in mind that there may be some bufferring going on, so you could still miss out on some of the output.

Edit: Added in check for $? to check status of child program

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I actually had nearly that code previously, but it didn't seem to play nicely with the alarm signal. Unlike with backticks, it would not print that it timed out until I killed the script, and I still had no output. That said, it wasn't 100% exactly the same as your code, so I'll try that ASAP. –  Slavik81 May 10 '11 at 2:29
    
Also, this doesn't address killing the hung test process. But still, thanks for the help. –  Slavik81 May 10 '11 at 2:36
    
@Slavik81 Sorry, missed that. Added it in, a check for $? –  Sodved May 10 '11 at 3:24
1  
The pid of the child is returned by the pipe open, you can use that to kill it on a timeout. You probably want to add another alarm 15 inside the loop to reset the timeout when you see some output. –  Andy May 10 '11 at 4:35
    
This nearly works. However, I hang on the conditional of the while loop. The line before it executes fine, but body of the while loop never executes, and the alarm can't break me out of my hung state. A ^C allows the script to continue to execute, but @output is never populated. –  Slavik81 May 10 '11 at 17:29

Write the output of the external command to a file, and read the file when the process is complete (normally or timing out). Like Sodved said, it's best if you can get the external program to flush its output frequently.

my $output_file = '/tmp/foo';
eval {
   local $SIG{ALRM} = sub {die "alarm\n"};
   alarm 15;
   system("testExecutable > $output_file 2>&1");
   alarm 0;
};

# whether successful or not, there could be output in $output_file ...
open my $fh, '<', $output_file;
@output = <$fh>;
close $fh;
unlink $output_file;
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This actually does get me output to a file and properly aborts upon timeout, so that's good. However, I still need the pid of that test executable to kill it when it hangs. And probably the pid of the script itself so I can generate a unique output file name. –  Slavik81 May 10 '11 at 17:34

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