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In Django a model's fields are defined as class attributes.

So that would mean all instances of a model would share the same values for those fields, no?

Say I have a model

class Tag(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=30)

And I have a form in which users can submit tags. Say a user submitted 2 tags: "Python" and "Django". If I create 2 instances of Tag in my view:

t1 = Tag(name="Python")
t2 = Tag(name="Django")

Since name is a class attribute shouldn't both t1 and t2 have the same value for name which in this case should be "Django"?

But in reality name behaves like an instance attribute instead of a class attribute. Can you explain what is going on?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

No, for the same reason as this:

>>> class Foo(object):
...     bar = 'Foo attribute'
...
>>> f = Foo()
>>> f.bar
'Foo attribute'
>>> Foo.bar
'Foo attribute'
>>> f.bar = 'instance attribute'
>>> f.bar
'instance attribute'
>>> Foo.bar
'Foo attribute'

When you assign an attribute to an object, a class attribute of the same name will be "eclipsed" by the object's. On attribute lookup, however, if the object in question does not define said attribute, the class one will be returned, instead.

In Django, those class attributes are used by the ORM layer to generate the mechanism that translates to SQL queries and operations (deep, metaclass magic going on behind-the-scenes).

edit: To answer your question--

To understand that, you need to understand a little bit about Python's data model. Essentially, both classes and objects have namespaces. This is apparent if you peek into their special __dict__attribute:

>>> print Foo.__dict__
{'__dict__': <attribute '__dict__' of 'Foo' objects>, '__weakref__': <attribute
'__weakref__' of 'Foo' objects>, '__module__': '__main__', 'bar': 'Foo attribute
', '__doc__': None}
>>> f = Foo()
>>> print f.__dict__
{}

When the object f is first created, it has an empty namespace. When you do a lookup, f.bar, this namespace (really, a dictionary) is looked up. Since there is no 'bar' attribute found there, f's class, Foo, is looked up. We find 'bar': 'Foo attribute' there. So that's what's going to be returned:

>>> f.bar
'Foo attribute'

Now, when you assign an attribute value to an object, and said attribute name does not yet exist in its namespace, it is created:

>>> f.bar = 'instance attribute'
>>> print f.__dict__
{'bar': 'instance attribute'}
>>> f.bar
'instance attribute'

Now, you know what happens the next time f.bar is looked up! f.__dict__['bar'] exists and will be returned before we even look at Foo's namespace.

Of course, if your intent is to always access and manipulate a class' attribute instead of the instance's, you'd need to use the class' name.

>>> Foo.bar
'Foo attribute'
>>> Foo.__dict__['bar']
'Foo attribute'
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OK this works. But according to Dive Into Python (diveintopython.org/object_oriented_framework/…) the class attribute is shared by the class and all instances of the class (see Example 5.18). So why isn't bar in your case shared by both Foo and f? I'm confused. –  Continuation May 10 '11 at 0:28
    
Answered it in the edit. –  Santa May 10 '11 at 0:49
    
I see. Thank you! –  Continuation May 10 '11 at 0:58
    
Doesn't also Django use quite a bit of __metaclass_ voodoo for both models and forms? –  vicvicvic May 10 '11 at 0:59
    
Liberal use of metaclass magic is apparent under the Django hood, that's as far as I know. –  Santa May 10 '11 at 1:01

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