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I'm wondering how to deal with member variables in closures in JavaScript. The following code alerts "6".

function testy()
{
    function blah()
    {
        this.a = 5;
        this.func = function()
        {
            this.a = 6;
            alert(this.a);
        }
    }

    var x = new blah;
    x.func();
}

but this code alerts 5.

function testy()
{
    function execute(func)
    {
        func();
    }

    function blah()
    {
        this.a = 5;
        this.func = function()
        {
            execute(function()
            {
                this.a = 6;
            });

            alert(this.a);
        }
    }

    var x = new blah;
    x.func();
}

How do I pass a closure which still accesses the member variables of the enclosing object?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
execute(function()
{
   this.a = 6;
});

function execute(func)
{
    func();
}

Your calling the function as func(); and by default without specifying a context this will resolve to the global context which is window in the browser.. There are three options you can use here.

make this local

var that = this;
execute(function()
{
   that.a = 6;
});

Now that points to the correct this.

bind this scope to the function

execute((function()
{
   this.a = 6;
}).bind(this));

This will bind the correct / expected this scope to your function. Note that Function.prototype.bind is ES5 and will break older browsers. _.bind is a reasonable cross browser alternative.

edit execute

function execute(f, context) {
    f.call(context);
}

execute(function() {
    this.a = 6;
}, this);

Your passing the context as an extra parameter to execute. Then execute will call Function.prototype.call to make sure that the function is called with the desired context

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I wouldn't say "immediatly scopes to window." but that it resolves to the global object, which is equivalent to window in browsers. There is enough confusion about this in javascript without infering it has something to do with scope. :-) –  RobG May 10 '11 at 0:51
    
@RobG edited to remove the word scope ;) –  Raynos May 10 '11 at 0:54
    
Excellent answer, thanks! But is there a typo ("that" instead of "this") in your "bind" example? –  bfops May 10 '11 at 10:51
    
@RobotGymnast thanks for pointing that out :) –  Raynos May 10 '11 at 10:53

Try this:

function blah()
{
    this.a = 5;
    this.func = function()
    {
        var self = this;
        execute(function()
        {
            self.a = 6;
        });
        alert(this.a);
    }
}
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