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So here's the pattern i'm looking for

out of a finite set, I want to retrieve the first 2 values for one set, then followed by the next 4 for another set, then 2 for that first set, and then 4 for the other set, and so on..

grab 2 | grab 4 | grab 2 | grab 4 ...

$count = 0;
foreach ($listing as $entry){
  if ($count % 4 == 0){
       // add to 4-item set
  } else if ($count % 2 == 0){
       // add to 2-item set
  }
  $count++;
}

My confusion is that when $count%4=0 then $count%2 will also = 0.

So should i be safe by not reaching the wrong modulus case (since both are true for any arbitrary number divisible by 4) by checking first if $count%4 == 0?

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I'm assuming, based on your use of foreach, that your code is only for PHP. Why the javascript tag? Do you want equivalent code for that as well? –  Dominic Barnes May 10 '11 at 1:05
    
because the logic is the same between both. –  Atticus May 10 '11 at 1:06
    
Why not pick 6 values in foreach loop and just directly place first two to first set and other 4 to other set? Simplifies things considerably :) –  McKracken May 10 '11 at 1:06
    
I'm not sure why the modulus matters...if you want to select 2 items, then 4 items, then 2 items, just count to 2, then count to 4, then count to 2. The way you're doing this, one of your two conditions is going to be true every other number until the end of your loop. –  AJ. May 10 '11 at 1:08
    
The modulus matters because it can be done with a modulus and it is much cleaner of a method for what I am trying to condition, no reason to not ask a difficult question to appease a simpler scenario. This is what programming is all about, is it not? –  Atticus May 10 '11 at 1:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I get it right, your desired distribution is actually:

A A, B B B B, A A, B B B B, A A, B B B B, ...

So you want to group them into six and then pick the first two into basked A, the other four into B:

if ($count % 6 < 2){
   // add to 2-item set
}
elseif ($count % 6 < 6){
   // add to 4-item set
}

Splitting it into if/elseif will ensure that the items only end up in either one. The < n comparison on the % 6 distribution would mean:

$count % 6 =    0  1  2  3  4  5  0
        if =   <2 <2 <6 <6 <6 <6 <2
    basket =    A  A  B  B  B  B  A
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly how i want to order my results. I think this is the exact modulus ordering i need –  Atticus May 10 '11 at 1:10
    
Mario thanks!! your edit is exactly what I was about to calculate, ty ty ty +1 –  Atticus May 10 '11 at 1:13
    
I always draw pictures for such things on paper. This often makes construing the conditions less confusing. –  mario May 10 '11 at 1:16
    
however -- did you reverse your php comments in the first example?? shouldn't it be the other way around? –  Atticus May 10 '11 at 1:17
    
Yes, from copy&pasting. I hoped nobody would notice the comments though.. :} –  mario May 10 '11 at 1:18

Not correct

You should grab to set 1 when count is 2, 8, 14, etc

Currently you are grabbing when count is 2, 4, 8, etc

And to set 2 when count is 6, 12, 18, etc

Currently it's when count is 4, 8, 12, etc

So condition 1 is ((count-2) % 6) == 0

And condition 2 is (count != 0) && (count % 6) == 0

Here's something that should work

$count = 0;
foreach ($listing as $entry){
  if ($count < 2){
       // add to 2-item set
  } else {
       // add to 4-item set
  }

  if ($count < 6) $count++; 
  else $count = 0;
}

Or if you want to grab 2/4 items at a time:

$count = 0;
foreach ($listing as $entry){
  if ($count == 2){
       // add 2 items to 2-item set
  } elseif ($count == 6) {
       // add 4 items to 4-item set
  }

  if ($count < 6) $count++; 
  else $count = 0;
}
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Thanks ariel -- this logic will work but I really am looking for just a modulus comparator, thanks tho +1 for an alternative idea. –  Atticus May 10 '11 at 1:14

This wouldn't work, for the exact reason that you specified.

Ways that this could be made to work are

  1. Use a modulo of 6, and then each time its module 6, add the first two elements starting from count - 6 to set1, and the next 4 to set2.
  2. Use a boolean switch, when the switch is true, add the elements to set 1, after 4 elements set the switch to false, and when the switch is false add elements to set2 flipping the value of the switch when you're done adding elements to set2.
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm this is an option, however I'd prefer to keep it clean with a simple modulus –  Atticus May 10 '11 at 1:12

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