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I'm sure there was a way to easily create an instance of a class but my search of the great interwebs hasn't found it. Lets say I have this:

List<LicencedCustomer> leftList = new List<LicencedCustomer>();

leftList.Add(new LicencedCustomer (LMAA_CODE:"1",LICENSE_NUMBER:"1",TRADING_NAME:"Bobs Liquor",STATE:"NSW",POSTCODE:"2261"));

My class looks like the below.

public class LicencedCustomer
{

    public string LMAA_CODE {get; set;}
    public string LICENSE_NUMBER {get; set;}
    public string TRADING_NAME {get; set;}
    public string STATE  {get; set;}
    public string POSTCODE  {get; set;}

    public LicencedCustomer(string LMAA_CODE, string LICENSE_NUMBER, string TRADING_NAME, string STATE, string POSTCODE)
    {
        this.LMAA_CODE = LMAA_CODE;
        this.LICENSE_NUMBER = LICENSE_NUMBER;
        this.TRADING_NAME = TRADING_NAME;
        this.STATE = STATE;
        this.POSTCODE = POSTCODE;
    }

    ...

Without the constructor immediately above, I get an error that the class doesn't contain a constructor that takes 5 arguments (initially I tried it with the values only and no field names in the List.Add function).

Is there a shortcut that allows assignment to properties on creation, without needing to define the constructor explicitly?

Thanks!

EDIT: Wide ranging curiosity has resulted from the capitalised properties - they are only that way because they've been built to reflect the headings of an import file. Not my preferred method!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you use new ( ) you call a constructor that matches the parameters. If you have no defined constructors you will get an implicit parameter less constructor.

To use the shortcut initializer use something like this.

public class sCls
{
    public int A;
    public string B;

}
static void Main(string[] args)
{
   sCls oCls = new sCls() {A = 4, B = "HI"};
}

Edit


From comments if you add a consturctor that takes a paramter you lose the implict paramterless constructor

public class sCls
{
    public sCls(string setB)
    {
        B = setB;
    }
    public int A;
    public string B;

}
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    sCls oCls = new sCls() {A = 4, B = "HI"}; // ERROR  error CS1729: 'csCA.Program.sCls' does not contain a constructor that takes 0 arguments
}

You can also use any constructor with the initializer list

public class sCls
{
    public sCls(string setB)
    {
        B = setB;
    }
    public int A;
    public string B;

}
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    sCls oCls = new sCls("hi") {A = 4, B = "HI"};
}

Remember that in all cases the constructor is called before the initializer list even if it has a parameter less constructor. So base class constructions or anything else that happens in the construction of the object will happen first.

    public class BSE
    {
        public BSE()
        {
            BaseA = "Bob";
        }
        public string BaseA;
    }
    public class sCls :BSE
    {

        public int A;
        public string B;

    }
static void Main(string[] args)
{
        sCls oCls = new sCls() {A = 4, B = "HI" };
        Console.WriteLine("{0}", oCls.BaseA);//Prints Bob
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Perhaps also point out that when using the initializer block (??) the ctor parenthesis can be omitted for the argument-less ctor, and that the initializer block can be used with any ctor. –  user166390 May 10 '11 at 3:22
    
Hi pst, would you mind explaining a bit more about what you mean here? Sounds interesting. –  Glinkot May 10 '11 at 3:27
    
More info for ya –  rerun May 10 '11 at 3:42
    
Thanks matey, appreciated. –  Glinkot May 10 '11 at 4:04

Add a default constructor, then try something like:

new LicencedCustomer() { LMAA_CODE = ..., LICENSE_NUMBER = ..., ... };

Side note: It's not conventional to capitalize properties.

share|improve this answer
    
It might be convention if they were constants. –  jocull May 10 '11 at 3:08
    
Not even for abbreviations, see HttpClient. –  Matthew Scharley May 10 '11 at 3:08
1  
@jocull They have setters, so they aren't constants. –  Matthew Scharley May 10 '11 at 3:09
    
Yeah, I know. Also not public const. –  jocull May 10 '11 at 3:09
2  
@Glinkot auto properties will be initialised to default(T) no matter what you do, so whether you set them yourself or not is neither here nor there. A default constructor is just a constructor without any parameters. –  Matthew Scharley May 10 '11 at 3:34

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