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Given two subquery tables t1 and t2, how can I return t2 if and only if t1 returned empty rows?

Edit: Added example

T1

SELECT * 
  FROM common_table 
 WHERE language_id = 1

T2

SELECT * 
  FROM common_table 
 WHERE language_id = 2

Basically what I am doing is that in case the T1 return empty rows, I would like it to execute T2 and return those rows. Now, I am fully aware that I can do this in PHP but the query is a subquery and I would rather let SQL (not PHP) code handle it.

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1  
SQL is not a programming language. –  zerkms May 10 '11 at 3:09
1  
Can you post the actual SQL statement you're trying to modify? –  Juliet May 10 '11 at 3:10
    
@Juliet added example –  arvinsim May 10 '11 at 3:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In MSSQL I can do something like

If EXISTS (SELECT * FROM common_table WHERE language_id = 1)
BEGIN
    SELECT * FROM common_table WHERE language_id = 1
END ELSE BEGIN
    SELECT * FROM common_table WHERE language_id = 2
END

Should be the same in mySQL or similar

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it is not sql though, it is t-sql. –  zerkms May 10 '11 at 3:42
    
The question specificly states mysql, but this does not work in mysql. Interesting to know, but not sure why it is the accepted answer. –  Luke Cousins Sep 12 '14 at 21:16
Select ...
From common_table
Where language_id = 1
    Or  (
        language_id = 2
        And Not Exists  (
                        Select 1
                        From common_table
                        Where language_id = 1
                        )
        )
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My MySql knowledge is a bit rusty and I think this should work.

SELECT * FROM common_table 
         WHERE language_id = 2 and 
               0 = ( SELECT count(*) FROM common_table 
                                     WHERE language_id = 1
                   ) ;
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+1 I think an improvement might be ... WHERE (language_id = 1) OR (language_id = 2 AND NOT EXISTS (SELECT NULL FROM common_table WHERE language_id = 1)). In my testing that gives all lang_id 1 records if there are any, else all lang_id 2, and the EXISTS might be more efficient than the COUNT. –  pilcrow May 10 '11 at 4:02
SELECT * 
  FROM common_table 
 WHERE language_id = 1
UNION
SELECT * 
  FROM common_table 
 WHERE language_id = 2
       AND NOT EXISTS (
                       SELECT * 
                         FROM common_table AS T2 
                        WHERE T2.language_id = 1
                      );
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