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Just for fun, I implemented my own stack, but, without using a linked list, but it was still dynamic, because every time you push on it, or pop off it, it malloc's a new array of a bigger or smaller size, and then fills it with what was already there (and one less or one more). I understand that this is very slow and a stupid way to do it, but, I just wanted to see if it works.

The code is sort of long, so I pastied it here:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct {
    int size;
    int *stack_array;
}stack;

void newStack(stack *a) {
    a->size = 0;
    a->stack_array = malloc(sizeof(int) * 1); 
}

void push(stack *a, int x) {
    int *new_array = malloc(sizeof(int) * a->size);
    int i;
    for(i=0; i < a->size; i++) {
        new_array[i] = a->stack_array[i]; 
    }

    new_array[i] = x;

    a->stack_array = new_array;

    a->size += 1;
}

int pop(stack *a) {
    if(a->size <= 0) {
        printf("CALL POP() WITH FILLED STACK");
        exit(1);
    }
    int *new_array = malloc(sizeof(int) * (a->size)-1);
    int i;
    for(i=0; i < a->size-1; i++) {
        new_array[i] = a->stack_array[i];
    }

    int popped = a->stack_array[i];

    a->stack_array = new_array;
    a->size -= 1;   
    return popped;
}   

void printStack(stack *a) {
    int i;
    printf("{");
    for(i=0; i<a->size-1; i++) {
        printf("%d, ", (a->stack_array)[i]);
    }
    printf("%d}\n", (a->stack_array)[i]);
}

int main (void) {
    stack a;
    newStack(&a);

    push(&a, 6);
    push(&a, 12);
    push(&a, 13);

    printStack(&a);

    printf("Popped: %d\n", pop(&a));

    printStack(&a);
    return 0;
}

And, as you can see, it works just fine.

Now, when I add a loop to it, to add a few more to the stack (pastied here):

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct {
    int size;
    int *stack_array;
}stack;

void newStack(stack *a) {
    a->size = 0;
    a->stack_array = malloc(sizeof(int) * 1); 
}

void push(stack *a, int x) {
    int *new_array = malloc(sizeof(int) * a->size);
    int i;
    for(i=0; i < a->size; i++) {
        new_array[i] = a->stack_array[i]; 
    }

    new_array[i] = x;

    a->stack_array = new_array;

    a->size += 1;
}

int pop(stack *a) {
    if(a->size <= 0) {
        printf("CALL POP() WITH FILLED STACK");
        exit(1);
    }
    int *new_array = malloc(sizeof(int) * (a->size)-1);
    int i;
    for(i=0; i < a->size-1; i++) {
        new_array[i] = a->stack_array[i];
    }

    int popped = a->stack_array[i];

    a->stack_array = new_array;
    a->size -= 1;   
    return popped;
}   

void printStack(stack *a) {
    int i;
    printf("{");
    for(i=0; i<a->size-1; i++) {
        printf("%d, ", (a->stack_array)[i]);
    }
    printf("%d}\n", (a->stack_array)[i]);
}

int main (void) {
    stack a;
    newStack(&a);

    int i = 0;
    for(i = 0; i<12; i++) {
        push(&a, i);
    }

    printStack(&a);

    return 0;
}

It runs fine on codepad (which confuses me some more), but, on my machine, it gives me this error (which I have never seen before, and this is given at runtime):

a.out: malloc.c:3096: sYSMALLOc: Assertion `(old_top == (((mbinptr) (((char *) &((av)->bins[((1) - 1) * 2])) - __builtin_offsetof (struct malloc_chunk, fd)))) && old_size == 0) || ((unsigned long) (old_size) >= (unsigned long)((((__builtin_offsetof (struct malloc_chunk, fd_nextsize))+((2 * (sizeof(size_t))) - 1)) & ~((2 * (sizeof(size_t))) - 1))) && ((old_top)->size & 0x1) && ((unsigned long)old_end & pagemask) == 0)' failed.
Aborted

It may or may not make a difference that the machine running this is a VirtualBox Linux machine. Also, I obviously have not written the implementation very well, seeing it doesn't free any pointers, or space, or check for many errors.

share|improve this question
3  
Please post the code here; codebin.org is timing out. Looking at the malloc source that causes the assert, the only thing that strikes me is that you may have corrupted your heap. I'd double check your code for any double-frees. –  Nathan Ernst May 10 '11 at 3:41
    
It looks like you have some memory corruption. Try Valgrind to see where your program did something wrong. –  sahaj May 10 '11 at 3:41
    
How would I check with valgrind? –  Dhaivat Pandya May 10 '11 at 3:57
    
Also, I'm not freeing anything, forget double freeing :P –  Dhaivat Pandya May 10 '11 at 3:57
1  
I followed your second link and found no pasties. Very disapointing. Now I am hungry. –  Ergwun May 10 '11 at 4:14
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In newStack, you say this:

void newStack(stack *a) {  
    a->size = 0;  
    a->stack_array = malloc(sizeof(int) * 1);   
}

So a->size is the index of the last element, not the number of elements. Then, in push, you do this:

int *new_array = malloc(sizeof(int) * a->size);  
int i;  
for(i=0; i < a->size; i++) {  
    new_array[i] = a->stack_array[i];   
}
new_array[i] = x;

The first time through, you malloc zero bytes for new_array, run through the for loop zero times, and then assign x to new_array[0]. And you now have a corrupted heap from a buffer overflow. You should be saying this:

int *new_array = malloc(sizeof(int) * (a->size + 1));

You should also be freeing your memory and maybe you should learn about realloc and memcpy.

share|improve this answer
    
No, a->size should be the number of elements in the stack (it starts out empty). And, still, I don't understand how it works for small values. –  Dhaivat Pandya May 10 '11 at 22:11
    
@Dhaivat: If you want a->size to be the number of elements then you should start with a->stack_array = NULL; and then ++a->size before you allocate your new array with int *new_array = malloc(sizeof(int) * a->size);. It works with small stack sizes because you're getting lucky, how lucky you are and what form that luck takes depends on the internal details of your malloc. –  mu is too short May 10 '11 at 22:38
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When you push something onto the stack, you're allocating one too few items. push() should maybe look like:

void push(stack *a, int x) {
    int *new_array = malloc(sizeof(int) * (a->size + 1));  // <=== changed
    int i;
    for(i=0; i < a->size; i++) {
        new_array[i] = a->stack_array[i]; 
    }

    new_array[i] = x;

    a->stack_array = new_array;

    a->size += 1;
}

And in pop(), even though you subtract one when performing the new allocation you're not performing the arithmetic correctly because of operator precedence. This isn't really a problem (in terms of heap corruption) because it causes your allocation to be too large by a little bit; you're just allocating a few bytes that you'll never actually use. Not to mention that your example program doesn't ever call it. Try:

int pop(stack *a) {
    if(a->size <= 0) {
        printf("CALL POP() WITH FILLED STACK");
        exit(1);
    }
    int *new_array = malloc(sizeof(int) * ((a->size)-1));  // <=== changed
    int i;
    for(i=0; i < a->size-1; i++) {
        new_array[i] = a->stack_array[i];
    }

    int popped = a->stack_array[i];

    a->stack_array = new_array;
    a->size -= 1;   
    return popped;
}   

You mention in a comment that you're not yet freeing any memory, so your next step is to properly free the memory blocks you're no longer using so there are no leaks...

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand how it works without a loop, however. –  Dhaivat Pandya May 10 '11 at 22:09
    
@Dhaivat: When you write past the end of a memory buffer, the invalid write may or may not get noticed by something else. Even if it doesn't get noticed, it's a bug - just one that's not as obvious. I'd bet that if your non-looping version pushed 12 items on the stack instead of just 3 you'd notice a similar crash as your looping version. –  Michael Burr May 10 '11 at 22:42
    
@Dhaviat: you can also usually get the compiler/run time library to help with finding these errors. For GCC with glibc see: gnu.org/s/hello/manual/libc/… –  Michael Burr May 10 '11 at 22:53
    
I was going to accept your answer (it helped me along with the one that mu posted), but, I cannot select two answers, and you have lots of reputation anyway, so... :P –  Dhaivat Pandya May 11 '11 at 23:08
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