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return type in c++

#include<iostream>
int& fun();
int main()
{
  int p=fun();
  std::cout<<p;
  return 0;
}

int & fun()
{
  int a=10;
  return  &a;
}

why does this code give error as,error: invalid initialization of non-const reference of type 'int&' from a temporary of type 'int*'..Actually i am not clear about the temporaries i.e. when are they created and when are they get destroyed.?so ,please explain temporaries to some extent too.

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marked as duplicate by Xeo, sbi, Matthieu M., BЈовић, Graviton May 10 '11 at 6:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
What happens in your code doesn't change. &a is a pointer, and int& is a reference, they are not compatible. Also, you're returning a dangling pointer/reference. But all of that was already explained in your other question. –  Xeo May 10 '11 at 3:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

&a generates a temporary which cannot be bound to a non-const reference.

Moreover your code has several flaws.

1) &a has type int* whereas you are returning by reference i.e int &. The types don't match.

2) Even if you change &a to a in the return statement you code still won't work because returning a local variable by reference and then using the result is UB.


Invalid initialization of non-const reference from a temporary

C++ doesn't allow temporaries to be bound to non constant references.

For example you can't do something like this

int &x = 5; 

because the temporary int(5) would be destroyed at the end the expression which it is a part of. However references to const can be initialized from a temporary i.e you can safely write

const int &x = 5;

In this case attaching the temporary to a const-reference prolongs its lifetime. It gets destroyed when x gets destroyed.

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1  
+1 For good explanation, as you always do :) –  Mahesh May 10 '11 at 4:09
    
What this sentence is supposed to mean : "&a generates a temporary which cannot be bound to a non-const reference." –  Nawaz May 10 '11 at 5:13
    
@Nawaz : The return type is a reference to non const. &a generates a temporary to be bound to the return value of the function (int& is the type) but C++ doesn't allow temporaries to be attached to non-const references and that's why gcc gives such error. –  Prasoon Saurav May 10 '11 at 5:19
    
The return type is a reference to non-const what? –  Nawaz May 10 '11 at 5:27
1  
&a yields a pointer, not a temporary. There is no expression in C++ that yields a scalar temporary, you only get them by binding scalar rvalues to lvalue-references-to-const or rvalue-references. –  FredOverflow May 10 '11 at 10:36
#include<iostream> 

int& fun(); 
int main() 
{   
    int p=fun();  
    std::cout<<p;  
    return 0; 
}  

int & fun() 
{   
   int a=10;   
   return  a; //Return a not &a
}

The error invalid initialization of non-const reference of type 'int&' from a temporary of type 'int*'' is because you are returning&aand nota`. Above code would compile correctly but it has a serious flaw. It returns a reference to a temporary stack variable in the function, Once the function returns all the stack variables get destroyed because of stack unwinding, Eventually you are left pointing to a address location that does not contain valid or values you expected.

You should always avoid returning pointers of references to local objects on stack!

The correct way to do this will be:

#include<iostream> 

int* fun(); 
int main() 
{   
    int *p =fun();  
    std::cout<< *p;  
    delete p; //delete dynamically allocated memory else memory leak
    return 0; 
}  

int* fun() 
{   
   int *a = new int;  //allocate dynamic memory 
   *a = 10;
   return  a; 
}
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This is ill-defined and results in indeterministic behavior. Compilers should give you a "returning reference to a local variable" warning here. –  Nathan Ernst May 10 '11 at 3:42
    
@Nathan Ernst, @Prasoon Saurav: I am explaning the OP why the specific error and I am still editing it..Patience! –  Alok Save May 10 '11 at 3:47
    
Deleted my comment :) –  Prasoon Saurav May 10 '11 at 3:49
    
sorry, SO doesn't show edit's are in progress. ;) –  Nathan Ernst May 10 '11 at 3:50
    
@Prasoon Saurav, @Nathan Ernst: It's ok...Ahh...trying to live around with my slow desktop is such a pain! :) –  Alok Save May 10 '11 at 3:57

You do not want to return &a from fun because a was allocated on the stack, and is not guaranteed to retain its value after fun returns.

You will need to use new or malloc to obtain heap-allocated memory (and then delete or free it afterwards) if you want the values to persist after fun returns. All variables normally declared in a function (for example as int foo) reside in its stack frame.

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Because the variable a is allocated on the stack and will go away as soon as the function returns leaving you with a reference to a bogus address.

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First of all, &a means "address of a." So you're not actually returning an int reference there; you're returning a pointer.

In either case, you should allocate a with new and then delete it later, or you'll run into undefined behavior.

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The return type of your function is int&. The expression in foo of &a (address-of) has type int*. To get a type of int&, you'd have to use the expression *&a. What this does is take the address of a and then dereference it, resulting in a reference, instead of a pointer. NOTE: Returning a reference (or pointer) to a non-static local-variable is ill-defined and will result in undefined behavior (best case: you can't reliably count on the value. worst-case: your hard-drive is reformatted).

In this case, you basically have 2 options: change the signature of your function to int foo(), or change the declaration of the local in a to be static int a and the return statement to just return a;. Note that changing a to be a static will make the function non-rentrant and non-threadsafe.

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