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This question is somewhat related to http://stackoverflow.com/questions/305880/hibernate-annotation-placement-question.

But I want to know which is better? Access via properties or access via fields? What are the advantages and disadvantages of each?

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19 Answers 19

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I prefer accessors, since I can add some business logic to my accessors whenever I need. Here's an example:

@Entity
public class Person {

  @Column("nickName")
  public String getNickName(){
     if(this.name != null) return generateFunnyNick(this.name);
     else return "John Doe";
  }
}

Besides, if you throw another libs into the mix (like some JSON-converting lib or BeanMapper or Dozer or other bean mapping/cloning lib based on getter/setter properties) you'll have the guarantee that the lib is in sync with the persistence manager (both use the getter/setter).

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3  
Note this is about how the ORM accesses your fields/properties and not your application code. With field access your getNickName() method would work exactly as you'd expect. The same is not true if you use the persistent 'properties' outside getters/setters. That is where you may hit issues with property access and lazy loading. So no, I don't agree with this argument in general. However, last time I checked Hibernate had issues with field access of @Id fields. –  Rob May 24 '10 at 1:38
    
I don't understand the above code, how could a void function return something? This must be a typo. –  Rosdi Kasim Jul 30 '10 at 9:26
    
@Rosdi - This probably was a typo, I edited the post to fix it. –  Hanno Fietz Oct 18 '10 at 9:58
3  
this answer is not related to the question. Best answer s by duffymo –  Janning Sep 22 '12 at 7:48

There are arguments for both, but most of them stem from certain user requirements "what if you need to add logic for", or "xxxx breaks encapsulation". However, nobody has really commented on the theory, and given a properly reasoned argument.

What is Hibernate/JPA actually doing when it persists an object - well, it is persisting the STATE of the object. That means storing it in a way that it can be easily reproduced.

What is encapsulation? Encapsulations means encapsulating the data (or state) with an interface that the application/client can use to access the data safely - keeping it consistent and valid.

Think of this like MS Word. MS Word maintains a model of the document in memory - the documents STATE. It presents an interface that the user can use to modify the document - a set of buttons, tools, keyboard commands etc. However, when you choose to persist (Save) that document, it saves the internal state, not the set of keypresses and mouse clicks used to generate it.

Saving the internal state of the object DOES NOT break encapsulation - otherwise you don't really understand what encapsulation means, and why it exists. It is just like object serialisation really.

For this reason, IN MOST CASES, it is appropriate to persist the FIELDS and not the ACCESSORS. This means that an object can be accurately recreated from the database exactly the way it was stored. It should not need any validation, because this was done on the original when it was created, and before it was stored in the database (unless, God forbid, you are storing invalid data in the DB!!!!). Likewise, there should be no need to calculate values, as they were already calculated before the object was stored. The object should look just the way it did before it was saved. In fact, by adding additional stuff into the getters/setters you are actually increasing the risk that you will recreate something that is not an exact copy of the original.

Of course, this functionality was added for a reason. There may be some valid use cases for persisting the accessors, however, they will typically be rare. An example may be that you want to avoid persisting a calculated value, though you may want to ask the question why you don't calculate it on demand in the value's getter, or lazily initialise it in the getter. Personally I cannot think of any good use case, and none of the answers here really give a "Software Engineering" answer.

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1  
Super explanation, that clears that up for me!! –  Carl O'Donnell Aug 22 '12 at 15:54
3  
The software engineering answer is: using accessors violates DRY. –  sourcedelica Jun 3 '13 at 23:44
    
(and encapsulation) –  sourcedelica Jun 3 '13 at 23:54
    
Very good one. Before I read this I'd been hesitating which one to use. –  Vic Jul 17 '13 at 10:53
    
@Martin I have a follow-up question regarding the last paragraph of your answer. You wrote "An example may be that you want to avoid persisting a calculated value". How can you avoid persisting a calculated value by having property based access? I know you are arguing not to do so but I am not getting the point here. Can you please explain? –  Geek Jun 19 at 11:12

I prefer field access, because that way I'm not forced to provide getter/setter for each property.

A quick survey via Google suggests that field access is the majority (e.g., http://java.dzone.com/tips/12-feb-jpa-20-why-accesstype).

I believe field access is the idiom recommended by Spring, but I can't find a reference to back that up.

There's a related SO question that tried to measure performance and came to the conclusion that there's "no difference".

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if you dont provide setter getter in entity then whats the use of that field...you cant use it anwyhere in the application , becuase fields are private –  anshulkatta Jul 3 at 10:49

Here's a situation where you HAVE to use property accessors. Imagine you have a GENERIC abstract class with lots of implementation goodness to inherit into 8 concrete subclasses:

public abstract class Foo<T extends Bar> {

    T oneThing;
    T anotherThing;

    // getters and setters ommited for brevity

    // Lots and lots of implementation regarding oneThing and anotherThing here
 }

Now exactly how should you annotate this class? The answer is YOU CAN'T annotate it at all with either field or property access because you can't specify the target entity at this point. You HAVE to annotate the concrete implementations. But since the persisted properties are declared in this superclass, you MUST used property access in the subclasses.

Field access is not an option in an application with abstract generic super-classes.

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touche. I hadn't thought of that. I bet Hibernate kicks out some crazy sql for these. –  Joseph Lust Dec 6 '11 at 6:36
6  
This problem sounds mechanically difficult to solve without annotating properties, but I've never ran into a case where I needed an abstract generic class with a lot of implementation that I also wanted to persist. Typically I create a class hierarchy to make my object polymorphic (which making it generic sort of breaks), and not solely for code reuse. And "lots and lots of implementation" often violates SRP anyway, in which case I would probably move it into separate classes. Is there a concrete example that make this use case more obvious? –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Sep 19 '12 at 5:19
    
The only concrete example I have is my application, which I can't describe in a 500 character comment ;-) –  HDave Oct 1 '13 at 14:21
1  
You can use abstract T getOneThing(), and abstract void setOneThing(T thing), and use field access. –  AVolpe Mar 20 at 16:38

I tend to prefer and to use property accessors:

  • I can add logic if the need arises (as mentioned in the accepted answer).
  • it allows me to call foo.getId() without initializing a proxy (important when using Hibernate, until HHH-3718 get resolved).

Drawback:

  • it makes the code less readable, you have for example to browse a whole class to see if there are @Transient around there.
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That really depends on a specific case -- both options are available for a reason. IMO it boils down to three cases:

  1. setter has some logic that should not be executed at the time of loading an instance from a database; for example, some value validation happens in the setter, however the data coming from db should be valid (otherwise it would not get there (: ); in this case field access is most appropriate;
  2. setter has some logic that should always be invoked, even during loading of an instance from db; for example, the property being initialised is used in computation of some calculated field (e.g. property -- a monetary amount, calculated property -- a total of several monetary properties of the same instance); in this case property access is required.
  3. None of the above cases -- then both options are applicable, just stay consistent (e.i. if field access is the choice in this situation then use it all the time in similar situation).
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I'm new to Hibernate and struggling with the same question. I think this post provides the most clear answer. Thank you. –  Sam Levin Jun 25 '12 at 5:22

I think annotating the property is better because updating fields directly breaks encapsulation, even when your ORM does it.

Here's a great example of where it will burn you: you probably want your annotations for hibernate validator & persistence in the same place (either fields or properties). If you want to test your hibernate validator powered validations which are annotated on a field, you can't use a mock of your entity to isolate your unit test to just the validator. Ouch.

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That's why you put validator-annotations on accessors and persistence-annotations on fields –  fishbone Apr 3 at 15:53

I believe property access vs. field access is subtly different with regards to lazy initialisation.

Consider the following mappings for 2 basic beans:

<hibernate-mapping package="org.nkl.model" default-access="field">
  <class name="FieldBean" table="FIELD_BEAN">
    <id name="id">
      <generator class="sequence" />
    </id>
    <property name="message" />
  </class>
</hibernate-mapping>

<hibernate-mapping package="org.nkl.model" default-access="property">
  <class name="PropBean" table="PROP_BEAN">
    <id name="id">
      <generator class="sequence" />
    </id>
    <property name="message" />
  </class>
</hibernate-mapping>

And the following unit tests:

@Test
public void testFieldBean() {
    Session session = sessionFactory.openSession();
    Transaction tx = session.beginTransaction();
    FieldBean fb = new FieldBean("field");
    Long id = (Long) session.save(fb);
    tx.commit();
    session.close();

    session = sessionFactory.openSession();
    tx = session.beginTransaction();
    fb = (FieldBean) session.load(FieldBean.class, id);
    System.out.println(fb.getId());
    tx.commit();
    session.close();
}

@Test
public void testPropBean() {
    Session session = sessionFactory.openSession();
    Transaction tx = session.beginTransaction();
    PropBean pb = new PropBean("prop");
    Long id = (Long) session.save(pb);
    tx.commit();
    session.close();

    session = sessionFactory.openSession();
    tx = session.beginTransaction();
    pb = (PropBean) session.load(PropBean.class, id);
    System.out.println(pb.getId());
    tx.commit();
    session.close();
}

You will see the subtle difference in the selects required:

Hibernate: 
    call next value for hibernate_sequence
Hibernate: 
    insert 
    into
        FIELD_BEAN
        (message, id) 
    values
        (?, ?)
Hibernate: 
    select
        fieldbean0_.id as id1_0_,
        fieldbean0_.message as message1_0_ 
    from
        FIELD_BEAN fieldbean0_ 
    where
        fieldbean0_.id=?
0
Hibernate: 
    call next value for hibernate_sequence
Hibernate: 
    insert 
    into
        PROP_BEAN
        (message, id) 
    values
        (?, ?)
1

That is, calling fb.getId() requires a select, whereas pb.getId() does not.

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This is funny! :) But it's an implementation-specific behavior, I'm sure. I –  Vladimir Dyuzhev Feb 27 '09 at 18:45
    
Yes, I guess this is due to the fact that only the persistent classes are instrumented. It's a pitty however because the id field is often the one field that has no business value and would not need any accessor. –  Maurice Perry Mar 25 '09 at 11:23

I would strongly recommend field access and NOT annotations on the getters (property access) if you want to do anything more in the setters than just setting the value (e.g. Encryption or calculation).

The problem with the property access is that the setters are also called when the object is loaded. This has worked for me fine for many month until we wanted to introduce encryption. In our use case we wanted to encrypt a field in the setter and decrypt it in the getter. The problem now with property access was that when Hibernate loaded the object it was also calling the setter to populate the field and thus was encrypting the encrypted value again. This post also mentions this: Java Hibernate: Different property set function behavior depending on who is calling it

This has cause me headaches until I remembered the difference between field access and property access. Now I have moved all my annotations from property access to field access and it works fine now.

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Yes - I have found that if you use property access you really cannot do anything in your setter besides set the field value. –  HDave Oct 1 '13 at 14:17

Are we there yet

That's an old presentation but Rod suggests that annotation on property access encourages anemic domain models and should not be the "default" way to annotate.

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I have solved lazy initialisation and field access here Hibernate one-to-one: getId() without fetching entire object

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Normally beans are POJO, so they have accessors anyway.

So the question is not "which one is better?", but simply "when to use field access?". And the answer is "when you don't need a setter/getter for the field!".

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3  
Problem is that you cannot mix field access and property access in a POJO - you have to choose one –  Martin OConnor Feb 27 '09 at 20:11
    
Really? I must have forgotten it. Anyway, I always use POJO an d accessors. –  Vladimir Dyuzhev Mar 1 '09 at 2:37
    
Note that with JPA 2.0 (which wasn't around when this question was asked) you can now mix access types using the @AccessType annotation. –  mtpettyp Jan 30 '10 at 17:33

i thinking about this and i choose method accesor

why?

because field and methos accesor is the same but if later i need some logic in load field, i save move all annotation placed in fields

regards

Grubhart

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I had the same question regarding accesstype in hibernate and found some answers here.

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To make your classes cleaner, put the annotation in the field then use @Access(AccessType.PROPERTY)

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I favor field accessors. The code is much cleaner. All the annotations can be placed in one section of a class and the code is much easier to read.

I found another problem with property accessors: if you have getXYZ methods on your class that are NOT annotated as being associated with persistent properties, hibernate generates sql to attempt to get those properties, resulting in some very confusing error messages. Two hours wasted. I did not write this code; I have always used field accessors in the past and have never run into this issue.

Hibernate versions used in this app:

<!-- hibernate -->
<hibernate-core.version>3.3.2.GA</hibernate-core.version>
<hibernate-annotations.version>3.4.0.GA</hibernate-annotations.version>
<hibernate-commons-annotations.version>3.1.0.GA</hibernate-commons-annotations.version>
<hibernate-entitymanager.version>3.4.0.GA</hibernate-entitymanager.version>
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We created entity beans and used getter annotations. The problem we ran into is this: some entities have complex rules for some properties regarding when they can be updated. The solution was to have some business logic in each setter that determines whether or not the actual value changed and, if so, whether the change should be allowed. Of course, Hibernate can always set the properties, so we ended up with two groups of setters. Pretty ugly.

Reading previous posts, I also see that referencing the properties from inside the entity could lead to issues with collections not loading.

Bottom line, I would lean toward annotating the fields in the future.

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Another point in favor of field access is that otherwise you are forced to expose setters for collections as well what, for me, is a bad idea as changing the persistent collection instance to an object not managed by Hibernate will definitely break your data consistency.

So I prefer having collections as protected fields initialized to empty implementations in the default constructor and expose only their getters. Then, only managed operations like clear(), remove(), removeAll() etc are possible that will never make Hibernate unaware of changes.

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You are not forced to expose anything as the setters can be protected. Also those setters are not part of the interface being implemented so even if they were public, they are not easily accessible. –  HDave Oct 1 '13 at 14:19

I prefer fields, but I've run into one situation that seems to force me to place the annotations on getters.

With the Hibernate JPA implementation, @Embedded doesn't seem to work on fields. So that has to go on the getter. And once you put that on the getter, then the various @Column annotations have to go on the getters too. (I think Hibernate doesn't want mixing fields and getters here.) And once you're putting @Column on getters in one class, it probably makes sense to do that throughout.

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