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Java has CopyOnWriteArrayList, which enables me to iterate and mutate using 2 different threads simultaneously, without having any external locking.

Do we have any similar thread safety data structure for C++?

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1  
i think you will need to create one yourself – asami May 10 '11 at 6:57
up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's nothing in the standard library which would support this. Given the interface to C++ standard containers, I'm not sure it's possible. You'd have to start with something like:

template <typename T>
class CopyOnWriteVector
{
    boost::shared_ptr<std::vector<T> > myData;
    void uniqueCopy()
    {
        myData = boost::shared_ptr<std::vector<T> >( new std::vector<T>( *myData ) );
    }
public:
    //  ...
    //  for example...
    void push_back( T const& newElement )
    {
        uniqueCopy();
        myData->push_back( newElement );
    }
    //  Similar for all other non-const functions.
    //  const functions just forward, without the call to
    uniqueCopy.
};

This doesn't work, however, for functions which return handles to some internal data: either iterators or references to elements. For iterators, it would be possible to create an iterator which contains a shared_ptr to the container it iterates into, e.g.:

template <typename T>
class CopyOnWriteVector
{
    //  ...
public:
    class iterator : public std::random_access_iterator_tag
    {
        boost::shared_ptr<std::vector<T> > myVector;
        typename std::vector<T>::iterator myImpl;
    public:
        iterator() {}  //  for convenience...
        iterator( boost::shared_ptr<std::vector<T> > const& vector,
                  typename std::vector<T>::iterator initialValue )
            : myVector( vector )
            , myImpl( initialValue )
        {
        }
        //  All other iterator functions forward directly to myImpl
    };
};

The functions which return references are another issue; you can't replace the reference with a smart reference, or a proxy of any type.

(Note: all of the above code is just off the top of my head, and probably contains significant errors. It's just to give an idea of the direction you might take.)

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+1, I was going to suggest this type of approach. – David Rodríguez - dribeas May 10 '11 at 12:37

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