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In my opinion the output of this program can only be

Hello 0 1 2 3 4 Yes

But the answer lists

0 1 2 3 4 Hello Yes

as a possible answer as well. My question is when the test is put to sleep, shouldnt main being the only other thread move to running state, this way Hello should always be printed first?

public class Lean   
{
    public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception 
    {
        Test test = new Test();
        test.start();
        System.out.print("Hello ");
        test.join();
        System.out.print("Yes");
    }
}

class Test extends Thread
{
    public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            Thread.sleep(2000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e)
        {}
        for (int counter=0; counter<5 ; counter++)
        {
            System.out.print(counter + " ");
            }
    }
}
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2  
Thread run order is non-deterministic... it could be that the sleep will allow another process to run and your test thread is the one that's resumed when execution returns to your process... sleep is not a good synchronisation method. –  forsvarir May 10 '11 at 7:11
    
@forsvarir: You should post this as an answer. –  Björn Pollex May 10 '11 at 7:12
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2 Answers

Thread run order is non-deterministic... it could be that the sleep will allow another process to run and your test thread is the one that's resumed when execution returns to your process... sleep is not a good synchronisation method

If you do want to start controlling the order that things are done in, then you need to look at things like Mutex...

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Thanks for the answers. I want to know whether one thread will always be executing at a given point of time. If there are just two threads, like in the program above (test and main) then if one of them is sleeping and is not blocking the other thread by holding on to some lock etc, then shouldnt the main thread kick in? Is it possible for all threads to be in runnable state and not have even a single thread executing at that instant, which seems to be the case here. –  Varun May 10 '11 at 9:18
    
@Varun: Because you don't control the scheduler, all of the threads for your application can be in a runable state, but the OS may be giving all of the execution time to other processes. When it gets back to your process, it may resume any of your threads in a Runnable state. It's quite unlikely on most platforms that a two second sleep wouldn't result in the main thread from running a bit, however there's no guarantee. Remember that java runs on a lot of different hardwares / OSs, so a REAL_TIME priority process may consume all of the cycles if a hardware event is triggered... –  forsvarir May 10 '11 at 9:29
    
Thanks for the explanation. I did not take into account the OS's role and that it may divert cpu time to processes unrelated to my java program. Thanks again. –  Varun May 10 '11 at 9:38
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Most of the time it will do what you expect. But there is a really really tiny chance that even if the thread sleeps for 2 seconds, main doesn't get a chance to run.

The point is: Thread.sleep won't force the scheduler to run the other thread (though it will give it a pretty good hint).

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