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I have a class, lets call it A, and within that class definition I have the following:

static QPainterPath *path;

Which is to say, I'm declaring a static (class-wide) pointer to a path object; all instances of this class will now have the same shared data member. I would like to be able to build upon this class, subclassing it into more specialised forms, layering behaviour, and with each class having its own unique path object (but not having to repeat the boring bits like calculating bounding boxes or calling the painting routines).

If I subclass it to create a class F (for example), I want F to use the inherited drawing routines from A, but to use the static (class-wide) path object declared in F. I have tried having the declaration above in the private section (and repeating it in the derived class F), and tried having it in the protected section, all with no joy.

I can sort of see why this is happening:

void A::paint() {
    this->path...

is referring to A::path instead of F::path, even when the object is of class F.

Is there an elegant way to get round this, and allow each class to maintain a static path object, while still using drawing code defined in the base class, and having all classes (except perhaps the base class) be real and instantiatable?

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Use a virtual method to get a reference to the static variable.

class Base {
private:
    static A *a;
public:
    A* GetA() {
        return a;
    }
};

class Derived: public Base {
private:
    static B *b;
public:
    A* GetA() {
        return b;
    }
};

Notice that B derives from A here. Then:

void Derived::paint() {
    this->GetA() ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Syntax for your static lines looks wrong. –  strager Feb 27 '09 at 13:38
    
Indeed, thanks for noticing. I also didn't mention that the static variables have to be initialized somehow :) –  Joao da Silva Feb 27 '09 at 13:39
1  
Thanks, this helped me solve the problem nicely. I went with separate names for the static members, and the simple getter function, but since the aim is to avoid having derived::paint() in each class, I made the getPath() virtual, which fixed everything. Many thanks. –  Tyr Feb 27 '09 at 14:09
    
You say use a virtual method, but I don't see the keyword virtual anywhere in that code. What makes the method virtual? –  abelenky Jan 20 at 15:28

You might be able to do a variant on a mix in or Curiously recurring template pattern

#include <stdio.h>

typedef const char QPainterPath;

class Base
{
public:
    virtual void paint() { printf( "test: %s\n", getPath() ); }
    virtual QPainterPath* getPath() = 0;
};

template <class TYPE>
class Holder : public Base
{
protected:
    static QPainterPath* path;
    virtual QPainterPath* getPath() { return path; }
};

class Data1 : public Holder<Data1>
{
};

class Data2 : public Holder<Data2>
{
};

template <> QPainterPath* Holder<Data1>::path = "Data1";
template <> QPainterPath* Holder<Data2>::path = "Data2";

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
Base* data = new Data1;
data->paint();
delete data;

data = new Data2;
data->paint();
delete data;
}

I have just run this code in CodeBlocks and got the following:

test: Data1
test: Data2

Process returned 0 (0x0)   execution time : 0.029 s
Press any key to continue.
share|improve this answer
    
To solve the asker's problem, you would also need to move all drawing routines into this template class. This might break other design requirements (e.g. the typical scenario of having a container of pointers to base and invoking x->do_something() on each -- template methods can't be virtual). –  j_random_hacker Feb 27 '09 at 14:11
    
I have code that does the above that works. –  David Allan Finch Feb 27 '09 at 14:34
    
Yes it does, but now I realise it's not the CRTP pattern: TYPE is not used anywhere inside template class Holder. Holder doesn't even need to be a template. What you have is basically the same "plain virtual function" solution given by others, but with the 2 members moved into an intermediate class. –  j_random_hacker Feb 27 '09 at 15:05
    
I think we will have to agree to disagree here as it is a CRTP and it is a better solution as the linker will tell you if you forgot get create a new path for a new type. –  David Allan Finch Feb 27 '09 at 15:15
    
Sorry I guess it is the CRTP, I'm just used to seeing that used for "compile-time polymorphism" instead. Yes, the linker will complain if you forget the definition, which is a good thing. OTOH you need to define a new Holder-style template class for each class that can be derived from. –  j_random_hacker Feb 27 '09 at 15:37

I haven't tested this, but introducing a virtual function:

struct Base {

    void paint() {
         APath * p = getPath();
         // do something with p
    }

    virtual APath * getPath() {
         return myPath;
    }

    static APath * myPath;
};

struct Derived : public Base  {

    APath * getPath() {
         return myPath;
    }
    static APath * myPath;
};

may be what you want. Note you still have to define the two statics somewhere:

APath * Base::myPath = 0;
APath * Derived::myPath = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Complete and clear. (I fixed a couple of typos.) Though you might cause a small amount of programmer confusion by naming the static variable identically in both classes mind you (I had to check whether C++ allows it!) –  j_random_hacker Feb 27 '09 at 14:04
    
This should be the answer - it is more complete and works out of the box. –  Manbroski Jan 8 at 7:10

You can use virtual functions to achieve your result. This is probably your cleanest solution.

class A
{
    protected:
        virtual QPainterPath *path() = 0;

    private:
        static QPainterPath *static_path;  /* Lazy initalization? */
};

QPainterPath *A::path()
{
    return A::static_path;
}

class F : public A
{
    protected:
        virtual QPainterPath *path() = 0;

    private:
        static QPainterPath *F_static_path;  /* Lazy initalization? */
};

QPainterPath *A::path()
{
    return F::F_static_path;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a reason why you added " = 0" to make path() pure virtual? AFAIK all that does is disable dynamic dispatch for path() -- i.e. it can't be called when the concrete type of the object is unknown at compile time -- and I can't see why that is desirable. Otherwise your solution looks good! –  j_random_hacker Feb 27 '09 at 13:49
    
@j_random_hacker, From what I know, this forces the function to be reimplemented. The function body is given, thus it is callable. Maybe I'm missing something myself (not unlikely). –  strager Feb 27 '09 at 20:36
    
@strager: Well it seems we're both partly right (and partly wrong... :) According to this interesting page: gotw.ca/gotw/031.htm, adding "=0" does force reimplementation in a derived class, however it also prevents the current class from being instantiated. –  j_random_hacker Feb 28 '09 at 13:57

You can't "override" static functions, let alone static member variables.

What you need is probably a virtual function. These can only be instance functions, so they will not be accessible without class instance.

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You probably don't want static variables to the overriden. Maybe you can store a pointer in your class instead?

class A
{
    public:
        A() :
            path(static_path)
        {
        }

    protected:
        A(QPainterPath *path)
            : path(path)
        {
        }

    private:
        QPainterPath *path;

        static QPainterPath *static_path;  /* Lazy initalization? */
};

class F : public A
{
    public:
        F() :
            A(F_static_path)
        {
        }

    private:
        static QPainterPath *F_static_path;  /* Lazy initalization? */
};
share|improve this answer

If you don't care about the appearance just use A:: or F:: preceding the use of path to choose the correct one, or if you don't like :: name them differently.

Another option is to use a function to tidy this away, e.g. virtual QPainterPath* GetPath() { return A::path; } in A and QPainterPath* GetPath() { return F::path; } in F.

Really though this issue is just about how the code looks rather than what it does, and since it doesn't really alter readability I wouldn't fret about this...

share|improve this answer
    
I think it does matter, because you want to reuse the inherited drawing routines on a different pointer. You can't do this by adding "A::" or "F::" to the drawing routines as they don't know which type they need! Virtual functions are necessary here. –  j_random_hacker Feb 27 '09 at 13:53

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