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#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(){
    int n=10;
    int a[n];

    for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
        a[i]=i+1;
        cout<<a[i]<<endl;
}
    return 0;
}

worked fine in Xcode4 under Mac

as said in books, it should be wrong, why?

so confused~

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To do this in a standard compliant way you'd use alloca() –  Jasper Bekkers May 10 '11 at 9:49
1  
alloca() is not standard C++ either. The standard method is in fact std::vector<int> a(n) –  MSalters Mar 15 '13 at 12:01
    
That it "works" doesn't mean it's not wrong :) char* ptr = "lol"; *ptr = 'a'; sometimes "works" too. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 5 '13 at 12:50
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit that reminded me of how I learned not to modify const strings in a very very very painful way :) –  revani May 2 '13 at 12:23

2 Answers 2

This a a C99 feature called VLA which some compilers also allow in C++. It's allocation on stack, just as it would be with int a[10].

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That is C99 feature that allows VLA (variable length array).

Compile it with g++ -pedantic, I'm sure that wouldn't compile.

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1  
You might also need -std=c++98 or -ansi. –  James Kanze May 10 '11 at 9:10

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