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I have the following tables

CREATE TABLE "COMPANIES" (
    "ID" NUMBER NOT NULL ,
    "NAME" VARCHAR2 (100) NOT NULL  UNIQUE
) 
/

CREATE TABLE "COMPANIESROLES" (
    "ID" NUMBER NOT NULL ,
    "COMPANYID" NUMBER NOT NULL ,
    "ROLENAME" VARCHAR2 (30) NOT NULL
) 
/

CREATE TABLE "ROLES" (
    "NAME" VARCHAR2 (30) NOT NULL
) 
/

This structure represents a number of companies and the roles allowed for each company. For these tables, there are the corresponding Hibernate objects:

public class Company implements Serializable {

    private Long id;
    private String name;
    private Set<Role> companyRoles;

    //(getters and setters omitted for readability)
}

public class Role implements Serializable {

        private String name;

        //(getters and setters omitted for readability)
}

Finding out all companies, which have a specific role using the Hibernate Criteria API is no problem:

Session session = this.sessionFactory.getCurrentSession();
Criteria criteria = session.createCriteria(Company.class);
criterion = Restrictions.eq("companyRoles.name", "ADMIN");
criteria.add(criterion);
List<Company> companyList = criteria.list();

Hibernate translates this to an SQL query (approximately)

SELECT *
FROM   companies this_
      inner join companyroles cr2_
         ON this_.id = cr2_.companyid
       inner join roles role1_
         ON cr2_.rolename = role1_.NAME
WHERE role1_.NAME = 'ADMIN'  

And now the problem: how can I reverse the query, i.e. find out all companies, which do not have a mapping for the role "ADMIN"? If I simply try to reverse the criterion by setting

criterion = Restrictions.ne("companyRoles.name", "ADMIN");

(not equals instead of equals), Hibernate creates a query like this

SELECT *
FROM   companies this_
      inner join companyroles cr2_
         ON this_.id = cr2_.companyid
       inner join roles role1_
         ON cr2_.rolename = role1_.NAME
WHERE role1_.NAME != 'ADMIN'  

Obviously, this does not produce the desired output, as the list still contains companies having the role "ADMIN", as long as the companies have at least one other role.

What I want to have is a list of companies, which do not have the role "ADMIN". As an additional restriction, this should be doable by just modifying the Criterion object, if possible (this is because the criterion is built automatically as part of an internal framework, and it is not possible to make larger changes there). The solution should also work, when the Criteria object contains other, additional criterions.

How is this doable, or is it?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You need a subquery (DetachedCriteria).

DetachedCriteria sub = DetachedCriteria.forClass(Company.class);
criterion = Restrictions.eq("companyRoles.name", "ADMIN");
sub.add(criterion);
sub.setProjection(Projections.property("id"));
Criteria criteria = session.createCriteria(Company.class);
criteria.add(Property.forName("id").notIn(sub));
List<Company> companyList = criteria.list();

Something like that should do it.

share|improve this answer
    
A good solution if there is only the single criterion. However, if there are other criteria in the Criteria object, the whole list would be reversed (that's why I mentioned that "this should be doable by just modifying the Criterion object, if possible"). Edited original post to clarify. –  simon May 10 '11 at 9:54
    
Sorry, I don't understand the problem. You can still add any restriction on the criteria itself. The criterion itself hasn't changed, it's just used in the subquery instead of the criteria. –  Stijn Geukens May 10 '11 at 10:35
    
If you add another restriction (in addition to the role criterion) to the criteria, e.g. that the company name is "blaa", and then your subcriteria, you reverse the result, i.e. you get all the companies, who do not have the role "ADMIN" and whose name is not "blaa". The desired result would be to have all companies without role "ADMIN" and with name "blaa". This is something which cannot be done with subquery - if I'm wrong, please correct me. –  simon May 10 '11 at 12:20
    
Yes, you need to add the restriction (name='blaa') on the criteria and not on the subquery. –  Stijn Geukens May 10 '11 at 14:10

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