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I have a buffer[] including HEX bytes and I want to search this buffer to find specific bytes. For example:

My buffer has 4096 bytes and I want to search in this if the bytes 45 34 67 23 (together) are inside this buffer (like searching a string in a buffer).

Have you any idea how can I do that? The programming language is C.

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2  
what language are you using? –  Mat May 10 '11 at 9:47
2  
What language? Also, is the most naïve implementation somehow problematic? (i.e. find the first byte with value 45, see if it's followed by 34 67 23, if not, repeat until end of array) –  Piskvor May 10 '11 at 9:47
    
i am sorry i forgot to say its for C language! sounds good this i.e. thank you :) –  nomercy May 10 '11 at 9:53
2  
@Paul maybe his buffer contains 0x0 bytes? –  RedX May 10 '11 at 10:17
1  
@RedX: good point - if GNU/Linux then there is memmem –  Paul R May 10 '11 at 10:19
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2 Answers

Just "brute-force" it :)

haystacklen = 4096;
needlelen = 4;

foundat = -1;
index = 0; /* start at a different number if searching for 2nd occurrence */
while (index < haystacklen - needlelen + 1) {
    if ((buffer[index + 0] == 45)
     && (buffer[index + 1] == 34)
     && (buffer[index + 2] == 67)
     && (buffer[index + 3] == 23))
    {
        foundat = index;
    }
    index++;
}
/* foundat has the index of the 1st search bytes or -1 */
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“When in doubt, use brute force” -- Ken Thompson –  pmg May 10 '11 at 10:38
    
Shouldn't that be while (index < haystacklen - needlelen) ? –  Paul R May 10 '11 at 10:38
    
@Paul R: That would be while (index <= haystacklen - needlelen). Pretend they're the same length: haystacklen - needlelen would be 0 and as index starts at 0, the loop would never run. –  pmg May 10 '11 at 10:41
    
d'oh - you're right - it just looked wrong to me... –  Paul R May 10 '11 at 11:30
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You could also use this much faster version. But you have to keep in mind that this only works for x86 / little endian processors because of the MAKEDWORD macro.

#define MAKEDWORD(a,b,c,d) ((uint32_t) (((uint32_t)a) & 0xFF) | ((((uint32_t)b) & 0xFF) << 8) | ((((uint32_t)c) & 0xFF) << 16) | ((((uint32_t)d) & 0xFF) << 24))
#define NEEDLE (MAKEDWORD(45,34,67,23))

// get the start and end address of the buffer
uint8_t *ptrEndBuffer = ((uint8_t*)buffer) + (4096 - sizeof(NEEDLE));
uint8_t *ptrStartBuffer = (uint8_t*)buffer - 1; // subtract -1 because we also want to get index 0

// while the result is not 0 we are good
while (ptrEndBuffer - ptrStartBuffer) {
    if ((*(uint32_t*)ptrEndBuffer) == NEEDLE) // get an whole integer instead of just one char
        break; // leave the loop if we found a match

    ptrEndBuffer--;
}

// the index will be -1 if we couldn't find a match else we subtract the start address + the 1 we first removed from the end buffer
int index = ((ptrEndBuffer == ptrStartBuffer) ? (-1) : (ptrEndBuffer - (ptrStartBuffer + 1)));
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you could also do: int index = (int)((int64_t)ptrEndBuffer - ((int64_t)ptrStartBuffer + 1)) // cast to long because if are working in the stack (high addresses) casting to int32_t could overflow the integers and render them negative –  DipSwitch May 10 '11 at 12:34
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