Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For example in the following from sass. Is the = just a shorthand for @mixin? I can't seem to find any info for this on google

=multi-line-button($base-color)
  +background-clip('padding-box')
  border-width: 1px
  +border-radius(6px)
  border-style: solid
  color: white
  display: block
  margin: 0.2em auto
  padding: 12px 15px
  text-align: center
  text-decoration: none
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

yes, this is the way to define mixins in Sass

dunno if this article will help at all

EDIT:

The following are identical

@mixin red-text
  color: #ff0000

=red-text
  color: #ff0000

Just add +red-text to your selectors

share|improve this answer
    
any idea why the official documentation doesn't have this info? is it deprecated or something? –  Fendo May 10 '11 at 11:04
    
Not quite sure why it's not in the docs. But it's totally fine to use both techniques. The docs do state that using @mixin is the "way", but I've always used the "=" technique myself - SASS changes all the time so this might be a backward compatibility feature..... –  marflar May 10 '11 at 11:17

"@mixin foobar" is the newer SCSS syntax (more CSS-like) and "=foobar" is the older SASS syntax (more HAML-like). I'm fairly new to SASS and started with SCSS, but both are supported (probably not in the same stylesheet) and both will continue to be supported.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.