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I'm trying to be lazy and implement the cast operators in the abstract base class rather than in each of the derived concrete classes. I've managed to cast one way, but I'm unable to cast the other. I think it might not be possible, but wanted to pick the collective SO mind before giving up:

public interface IValueType<T>
{
    T Value{ get; set; }
}

public abstract class ValueType<T> : IValueType<T> {
    public abstract T Value { get; set; }
    public static explicit operator T(ValueType<T> vt) {
        if(vt == null)
            return default(T);
        return vt.Value;
    }

    public static implicit operator ValueType<T>(T val) {
        ValueType<T> vt = new ValueType<T>(); //<--- obviously this won't work as its abstract
        vt.Value = val;
        return vt;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Part of me thinks you could do this with reflection, but most of me says it makes more sense to do it in the derived classes, because it's the individual derived class's job to know how to go from T to it, not the job of the abstract class. –  Matt Ellen May 10 '11 at 11:53
    
Actually, I don't think you can do it even with reflection, since they're static methods, and what I was thinking required instance methods. –  Matt Ellen May 10 '11 at 11:57
    
@Matt Ellen I agree it's better to do it in the concrete classes but I'd rather write the method once rather than copy it into the dozens of derived classes. –  sprocketonline May 10 '11 at 12:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You need to introduce another generic parameter to identify the concrete type.

something like..

public interface IValueType<T> 
{    
    T Value{ get; set; } 
} 

public abstract class ValueType<T,K> : 
    IValueType<T> where K : ValueType<T,K>,new()
{     
    public abstract T Value { get; set; }     
    public static explicit operator T(ValueType<T,K> vt) 
    {         
        if(vt == null)            
            return default(T);         
        return vt.Value;     
    }      

    public static implicit operator ValueType<T,K>(T val) 
    {         
        K k = new K();
        k.Value = val;
        return k;    
    } 
} 

Create your concrete class

public class Test : ValueType<int,Test>
{
    public override int Value {get;set;}
}

Then

var t = new Test();
t.Value = 99;
int i = (int)t;
Test t2 = (Test)6;

Console.WriteLine(i);
Console.WriteLine(t2);
share|improve this answer
    
I see that you still have to explicitly cast an int to Test: Test t2 = (Test)6;. I guess that's because we can't implement public static implicit operator K(T val){...} without incurring a compile-time error (CS0556). –  sprocketonline May 14 '11 at 9:07
    
I thought of a solution of chaining the implicit operators but got stuck there, see: stackoverflow.com/questions/6001854/… –  sprocketonline May 14 '11 at 12:34

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