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How to store temporary item in ObjectContext without saving to database?

Context storing in HttpContext, providing by class:

public static class HttpContextExtension
{
    public static MyEntityDataModelContainer GetMyContext(this HttpContext httpContext)
    {
        if (httpContext.Items["MyEntityDataModelContainer"] == null)
        {
            httpContext.Items.Add("MyEntityDataModelContainer", new MyEntityDataModelContainer());
        }

        return (MyEntityDataModelContainer)httpContext.Items["MyEntityDataModelContainer"];
    }
}

There are two empty pages: 1) FirstPage.aspx.cs:

public class FirstPage : Page
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        // crete new item
        MyEntity newTemporaryItem = new MyEntity { MyEntityID = Guid.NewGuid() };
        // attach them to Context
        HttpContext.Current.GetMyContext().MyEntitySet.Attach(newTemporaryItem);
        // save changes
        HttpContext.Current.GetMyContext().SaveChanges();

        // get all attached to Context items
        var addedItems = (from se in HttpContext.Current.GetMyContext().ObjectStateManager.GetObjectStateEntries(EntityState.Unchanged)
                          where se.Entity is MyEntity
                          select se.Entity).AsQueryable();
        int CountInFirstPage = addedItems.Count();
    }
}

So, CountInFirstPage = 1.

2) SecondPage.aspx.cs:

public class FirstPage : Page
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        // get added in First page items From HttpContext
        var addedItems = (from se in HttpContext.Current.GetMyContext().ObjectStateManager.GetObjectStateEntries(EntityState.Unchanged)
                          where se.Entity is MyEntity
                          select se.Entity).AsQueryable();
        int CountInSecondPage = addedItems.Count();
    }
}

Here CountInSecondPage = 0.

Where I'm wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Am I right that the second page is a second request?

In that case you have a new HttpContext.Items collection and your values from the last request are gone. Consider to use a session to store these values in such a case.

Footnote: The EntityContext should only be used for one request and can be stored in the HttpContext.Items collection for that reason but never as a Session value! Store just results here like the count.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, SecondPage targeting from FirstPage by link... Trying to use Session –  asolovyov May 10 '11 at 13:16
    
It works! I remade the HttpContextExtension via httpContext.Session. Thanks! –  asolovyov May 10 '11 at 14:16
2  
That's nothing new and I just need to quote @BrokenGlass But even if it were possible to store the DB context that way, i.e. even if you decided to store it in the Session - this is not the way to go - the scope of each context should be a single unit of work, you should not keep it alive for an extended period of time, especially in a Web environment. It is really bad to keep your EntityContext alive in a WebEnvironment. You should always drop it and just store results that you may need later. There are so many cons that never fit in this comment. –  sra May 10 '11 at 18:45
2  
You don't loose that much performance when setup the EntityContext new with each request. And in your example you just needed the count in the next request. You could also store that values as GET params in the link what set you free from a session. With that they will be available in the next view. In my opinion that would be the cleanest solution for your case. The value is store exactly where you needed. No matter if there are just one or hundreds –  sra May 10 '11 at 18:46
3  
There is a really good book about EntityFramework 4 from Julie Lerman You should read it. –  sra May 10 '11 at 19:24

This is the wrong approach, HttpContext only has a scope of a single HTTP request, so you are dealing with a different context in the second request.

But even if it were possible to store the DB context that way, i.e. even if you decided to store it in the Session - this is not the way to go - the scope of each context should be a single unit of work, you should not keep it alive for an extended period of time, especially in a Web environment.

Just save your temporary items in the Session directly, and create a new context to upload these items when you are ready to.

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-1 The session is a poor solution for an Entity Framework object. EF only enumeratates on an as needed basis so any child objects are not going to exist and when you call the save changes method for the EF it will fail. –  Chad May 10 '11 at 13:35
    
As far as I can tell from above the class instance is just an entity class with no other dependencies and not attached to a context, so just as you can save any other class instance in the session, you should be able to do the same with this one. I don't quite understand your concern. –  BrokenGlass May 10 '11 at 13:41
    
He needs to retrieve the changed object in the query on the second page i would assume for a databind to a control. –  Chad May 10 '11 at 13:53
    
@Chad Yep, I'll use that value to bind it to ComboBox in the second page. One possible way is pass values via Session between pages and attach recieved values to Context, right? –  asolovyov May 10 '11 at 18:39
    
@BrokenGlass I don't see anything wrong in your post. Dunno what Chad means. therefore +1 –  sra May 10 '11 at 18:53

In order to run a query on your new data using EF you will need to save. You could to a to list then run the query against the list but that will require you to keep the list in some sort of static memory (session state, viewstate, cache) but if the list is large that may create other problems.

You could do everything in a TRANSACTION. Passing the transaction around until you either commit or roll back. The entity objects get saved but when the transaction is rolled back then any changes are undone. I think that the transaction will persist through postbacks and redirects but will need to be committed or disposed by the time your page is rendered.

share|improve this answer
    
Did you mean "Passing the transaction around" == pass it between pages? I thought that it works only with one EntityContext... –  asolovyov May 10 '11 at 18:45

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