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Hi I see following code:

void UpdateMessage (string message)
{
    Action action = () => txtMessage.Text = message;
    this.Invoke (action);
}

Why using Action and then invoke action here? Why not just using txtMessage.Text = message to replace the code in function body?


Update

A fuller version of the code, presented in a comment, reproduced below with syntax highlighting, indentation etc.

public partial class Form1 : Form 
{ 
    public Form1() 
    { 
        InitializeComponent(); 
        new Thread(Work).Start(); 
    } 

    void Work() 
    { 
        Thread.Sleep(5000); 
        UpdateMessage("My Garden"); 
    } 

    void UpdateMessage(string message) { 
        Action action = () => textBox1.Text = message; 
        this.Invoke(action); 
    } 
} 
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Is this in WinForms? –  Daniel A. White May 10 '11 at 13:18
1  
I think what you've stumbled onto there is what we in the business call "bad code". It might have been copied from someplace in the system that actually needed indirection. But you are 100% right. This does not. –  Axeman May 10 '11 at 13:19
    
@Axeman How can you tell from the code supplied that UpdateMessage always runs in the GUI thread? –  David Heffernan May 10 '11 at 13:22
3  
@Axeman this is not a "bad code", this is UI thread invocation. –  Viacheslav Smityukh May 10 '11 at 14:34
1  
Not to be confused with a action.Invoke() call –  Viacheslav Smityukh May 10 '11 at 14:40
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3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Because this code runs on a different thread from the UI and must be marshalled across to the UI thread with Invoke.

The documentation for Control.Invoke() states:

Executes the specified delegate on the thread that owns the control's underlying window handle.

This is all necessary because the underlying Windows framework requires that operations on a window handle are performed by the thread that owns the window handle.

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If UpdateMessage is called from another thread you need to Invoke into main thread in order to interact with GUI elements

If you use just txtMessage.Text = message you will get CrossThreadOperationException

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Yes, this UpdateMessage is invoked in another thread other than main UI thread. But why I use txtMessage.Text = message and didn't see the exception which is supposed to be there? Thanks! –  spspli May 10 '11 at 15:07
add comment

You should work with a control's properties in the UI thread, otherwise you will receive exception.

Control.Invoke() will execute your delegate by sending windows message to the window message loop.

But you can optimize code to prevent unnecessary thread syncronization when it don't required:

void UpdateMessage (string message)
{
    if(InvokeRequired)
    {
        Invoke((Action)()=>UpdateMessage(message));
        return;
    }

    txtMessage.Text = message;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the full code: –  spspli May 10 '11 at 14:24
    
using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.ComponentModel; using System.Data; using System.Drawing; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.Windows.Forms; using System.Threading; namespace TestAction { public partial class Form1 : Form { public Form1() { InitializeComponent(); new Thread(Work).Start(); } void Work() { Thread.Sleep(5000); UpdateMessage("My Garden"); } void UpdateMessage(string message) { Action action = () => textBox1.Text = message; this.Invoke(action); } } } –  spspli May 10 '11 at 14:24
1  
In this code, you call UpdateMessage method from the thread that was started in from constructor. The Control.Invoke() call is nessesary in the current scenario. –  Viacheslav Smityukh May 10 '11 at 14:33
    
Thanks! I know this is necessary now. But I just wonder why if I don't use it, I didn't see any exception. –  spspli May 10 '11 at 15:09
    
Try start it under debugger, you should see that exception. –  Viacheslav Smityukh May 10 '11 at 15:12
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