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I'm trying to write a password validator.

How can I see if my supplied string contains at least 3 different character groups?

It's easy enough to check if they are existant or not ---but at least 3?

  • at least eight (8) characters

  • At least three different character groups

    upper-case letter

    lower-case letter

    numeric

    special characters !@#$%&/=?_.,:;-\

(I'm using javascript for regex)

share|improve this question
    
Btw, @Yonder, why do you need just one regexp? Do you want to put it to some JS-validation controls? –  gaRex May 10 '11 at 14:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Just to learn - would this kind of requirement be possible to implement in pure regex?

That'd make it a rather hard to read (and therefor maintain!) solution, but here it is:

(?mx)
^
(
  (?=.*[a-z])(?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*[0-9])                # must contain a-z, A-Z and 0-9
  |                                                # OR
  (?=.*[a-z])(?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*[!@\#$%&/=?_.,:;\\-]) # must contain a-z, A-Z and special
  |                                                # OR
  (?=.*[a-z])(?=.*[0-9])(?=.*[!@\#$%&/=?_.,:;\\-]) # must contain a-z, 0-9 and special
  |                                                # OR
  (?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*[0-9])(?=.*[!@\#$%&/=?_.,:;\\-]) # must contain A-Z, 0-9 and special
)
.{8,}                                              # at least 8 chars
$

A (horrible) Javascript demo:

var pw = "aa$aa1aa";
if(pw.match(/^((?=.*[a-z])(?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*[0-9])|(?=.*[a-z])(?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*[!@#$%&\/=?_.,:;\\-])|(?=.*[a-z])(?=.*[0-9])(?=.*[!@#$%&\/=?_.,:;\\-])|(?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*[0-9])(?=.*[!@#$%&\/=?_.,:;\\-])).{8,}$/)) {
  print('Okay!');
} else {
  print('Fail...');
}

prints: Okay!, as you can see on Ideone.

share|improve this answer
    
As an aside, I've always wanted regex to have the ability to store patterns. I find myself re-using patters quite a few times for it to not be a meaningful option. Basically, something like (?\A[a-z]) to assign \A to [a-z]. Guess I'll keep dreaming. –  Brad Christie May 10 '11 at 13:58
    
@Brad, that is a nice idea. You can build your pattern up from strings of course and concatenate them and do new RegExp(a+"@"+a), where a is a predefined pattern-string. (but you're probably aware of it...) –  Bart Kiers May 10 '11 at 14:02
    
@BartKiers: That's what I have been doing, just for ease of maintainability, but it'd be nice to see "regex macros". Maybe force definition at the beginning of the pattern, then allow use for the duration of that pattern. ;-) –  Brad Christie May 10 '11 at 14:06
    
@Brad, many regex-enthusiast would welcome such trickery (like me), but, as you may know, for every regex-enthusiast, there are probably about 10 people that are against introducing such short-cuts in an already "hard to read" language. :) –  Bart Kiers May 10 '11 at 14:10
    
@BartKiers: I agree, need we bring back :labels and gotos? And you know what they say about solving a problem with regex: now you have two problems. :grin: –  Brad Christie May 10 '11 at 14:13

May as well join in on the fun:

String.prototype.isValidPW = function(){   
    // First, check for at least 8 characters
    if (this.length < 8) return false;

    // next, check that we have at least 3 matches
    var re = [/\d/, /[A-Z]/, /[a-z]/, /[!@#$%&\/=?_.,:;-]/], m = 0;
    for (var r = 0; r < re.length; r++){
        if ((this.match(re[r]) || []).length > 0) m++;
    }

    return m >= 3;
};

if ("P@ssW0rd".isValidPW()) alert('Acceptable!');

Demo

share|improve this answer
    
Nice one. Note that you need not escape the ., $ and ? inside a character class. –  Bart Kiers May 10 '11 at 14:17
    
@BartKiers: Funny story with that: I escaped the ] by accident and was getting JS errors. A little puzzled that the pattern wasn't being accepted, I escaped everything and one-by-one removed the ``s. Then, a head scratch later, I caught it and forgot to unescape the rest. :oops: ;-) –  Brad Christie May 10 '11 at 14:20
    
Most cool will be to put it not in String.proto, but in some another object. And also to create those regexps once, like: jsfiddle.net/XnPb4 –  gaRex May 10 '11 at 14:57
    
This was my favorite solution, but none of the solutions provided ensured that all the characters were of the acceptable type. For instance, a single quote (') would alert 'Acceptable!' here. My quick fix was to change the return to: return (m >= 3 && this.match(/^[0-9a-zA-Z!@#$%&\/=?_.,:;-]+$/)); –  Gremio Jan 16 at 17:31

I am assuming that you will be using different regexes for different requirements. In that case, tell me if the following work for you:

var e = password.match(/.{8,}/); //At least 8 chars

var a = password.match(/[0-9]+/); //numeric
var b = password.match(/[A-Z]+/); //Capitals
var c = password.match(/[a-z]+/); //small letters
var d = password.match(/[!@#\$%&/=?_.,:;-\\]+/); //special chars

if (a + b + c + d > 2 && e) {// Success}
else {// Failure}
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice and simple solution to understand. Very readable. Thanks. –  Yonder May 10 '11 at 13:42
    
Just to learn - would this kind of requirement be possible to implement in pure regex? –  Yonder May 10 '11 at 13:43
    
@Yonder: Yes and no. You can validate that it has an [A-Z], [a-z], [0-9], [<special>] but not that there are 3 out of 4 (that I'm aware) without breaking it out in to separate functionality. –  Brad Christie May 10 '11 at 13:45
    
By the way - is it necessary to escape the characters when put in a character class, ie. in [] brackets? –  Yonder May 10 '11 at 13:51
    
@Yonder: Only characters that are meaningful to regex. e.g. a period (.) means "any character", so when you want a literal period you would use \.. Same for $ (End of line), / (in this case because it's pattern wrapper), ? (means character is optional, or ungreedy flag), - within a class ([]) means range so you can either use it at the end of the class or escape it, etc. –  Brad Christie May 10 '11 at 13:53

http://jsfiddle.net/aSsR8/6/

/**
 * Function determine, wheter we have valid password
 * 
 * @param {String} value
 * @return {Boolean}
 */
function isValidPassword(value) {
    // Here we define all our params
    var validLength = 8,
        minSuccess  = 3,
        isNumeric   = + /\d+/.test(value),
        isCapitals  = + /[A-Z]+/.test(value),
        isSmall     = + /[a-z]+/.test(value),
        isSpecial   = + /[!@#$%&\/=\?_\.,:;\-]+/.test(value);

    if (value.length < validLength) { // 8 symbols. We don`t need regexp here
        return false;
    }

    if (isNumeric + isCapitals  + isSmall + isSpecial < minSuccess) {
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}


document.writeln(isValidPassword('abc'));
document.writeln(isValidPassword('abc123ABC'));
document.writeln(isValidPassword('abc123!23'));
share|improve this answer
    
since when does ... = + ... work with an arithmetic operator after the assignment? –  Brad Christie May 10 '11 at 14:23
    
It`s a shorthand to type cast to int. I saw it somewehere here yesterday :) –  gaRex May 10 '11 at 14:52

Crimson's answer didn't work for me. Here is what I have.

var mystring = 'bLahbla\\';
var valid_char_count = 0;
var lc = mystring.match(/[a-z]+/);
var uc = mystring.match(/[A-Z]+/);
var dc = mystring.match(/[0-9]+/);
var sc = mystring.match(/[\!\@\#\$\%\&\=\?\_\.\,\:\;\-\\]/);

if( lc ){ valid_char_count++; }
if( uc ){ valid_char_count++; }
if( dc ){ valid_char_count++; }
if( sc ){ valid_char_count++; }

if( valid_char_count >= 3 ){ /* success */ }
share|improve this answer

This will do all that in one regex

^.*(?=.{8,})(?=.*[a-z])(?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*[\d\W])(?=.*[!@#\$%&/=?_\.,:;-\\]).*$

share|improve this answer
    
i should add that IE6 doesn't support lookahead –  herostwist May 10 '11 at 14:00
    
Doesn't grab 3 out of 4 for me. "Password" & "PassWord" are acceptable per this pattern (missing either a numeric or a special to be valid). –  Brad Christie May 10 '11 at 14:01
    
This one seems to work for me...Password and PassWord fails for me, but PassW0rd succeeds –  Yonder May 10 '11 at 14:13
    
@Yonder: Interesting. Maybe gskinner's got a bug? –  Brad Christie May 10 '11 at 14:34
1  
Do you need two .* pattern matches (1 before the look aheads and 1 after them)? It seems like you would only need 1 '.*' between ^ and $. Also, this doesn't ensure you have 3 of 4 classes. You have to have an uppercase character and a lower case character; and you have to have at least a digit or special character. For instance, 'pa$$w0rd' would not match, even though it has 3 classes. –  Gremio Jan 16 at 17:28

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