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using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using Newtonsoft.Json;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;
using Newtonsoft.Json.Serialization;
using System.Linq;
using System.Reflection;
public interface IParent
{
    [JsonProperty]
    int Id {get;set;}
}

[JsonObject(MemberSerialization.OptIn)]
public class Parent : IParent
{
    public int Id { get;set; }  
    public string Name {get;set;}   
}

public class Serializer
{
    public static void Main()
    {

        var parent = new Parent() { Id = 1, Name ="Parent"};        
        var sb = new StringBuilder();
                var sw = new StringWriter(sb);

                var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings()
                       {
                           NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore                            
                       };

            var output = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(parent, Formatting.None, settings);
                Console.WriteLine(output);
            Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

In the above code, the output is {}. Is it possible to serialize and get the output as {"Id":1}?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a bad idea.

Having said that, Newtonsoft provides a way for you to change what's serialized: in this case, you'd subclass DefaultContractResolver and override CreateProperty.

The problem is, it isn't easy to decide when you should opt-in to serialization based on an interface's attributes. For one thing, a class could potentially implement multiple interfaces with conflicting serialization instructions. Moreover, deserializing an object into a variable declared as a conflicting interface (for example) won't work. It's fragile and it isn't secure (it allows external code to specify what data an instance reveals).

If you have to do it, the code below works for your case:

public class InterfaceContractResolver : DefaultContractResolver, IContractResolver
{
    public InterfaceContractResolver() : this(false) { }
    public InterfaceContractResolver(bool shareCache) : base (shareCache) {}

    protected override JsonProperty CreateProperty(MemberInfo member, MemberSerialization memberSerialization)
    {
        var property = base.CreateProperty(member, memberSerialization);
        var interfaces = member.DeclaringType.GetInterfaces();
        foreach (var @interface in interfaces)
        {
            foreach (var interfaceProperty in @interface.GetProperties())
            {
                // This is weak: among other things, an implementation 
                // may be deliberately hiding an interface member
                if (interfaceProperty.Name == member.Name && interfaceProperty.MemberType == member.MemberType)
                {
                    if (interfaceProperty.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(JsonPropertyAttribute), true).Any())
                    {
                        property.Ignored = false;
                        return property;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        return property;
    }

}

Then, when you're creating your serializer, pass it an instance of your resolver in the settings:

var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings()
{
    NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore,
    ContractResolver = new InterfaceContractResolver(true)
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jeff, I was looking for something similar. – Gopal May 11 '11 at 6:26
    
I am always amazed at Json.NET's flexibility. It is nice to know that if I ever need to jam to force this into working I can. – Frank May 11 '11 at 12:58
    
One way of making thousand less volatile would be to make a SerializeAs attribute that forces you to specify only one interface. That or pre-scan for conflicts. – George R Nov 25 '12 at 23:16

See here...I do not believe that this works. JsonProperty attributes on the interface are ignored for the object that implements the interface.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the link frank, I understand that the attributes are not inherited from interfaces to the implementation,as they suffer the Multiple Inheritance issue. – Gopal May 11 '11 at 6:45

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