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I have a page that calls a Stored procedure to read 3 to 4 million data, make some calculations and return a small data table. The SP is slow approx. 20 to 30 sec. therefore, overall page load is slow.

Will i re-factor the SP? but problem is that whatever i do my end result will be the small Datatable.

Is there any suggestion to improve the performance?

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4  
Any more details? Why does the procedure have to read 3 to 4 million records? What is the table structure and the query being run? –  David Duffett May 10 '11 at 13:52
3  
You didn't even post the database engine being used. How are we supposed to help you? –  maple_shaft May 10 '11 at 13:54
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reading 3-4 million rows will take time - Are that may rows really read or is that the numbers of rows in the table? Perhaps an index would help? Please post what database you are using. –  vidstige May 10 '11 at 13:56
    
I have been using SQL Server 2008. the SP script is created for aggregating data from more then 5 tables. cursor is avoided and I need group by all the data to make small data table. It is actually a matrix like data table. –  Shuvra May 10 '11 at 14:24
    
but i can run this sp in back ground before loading this page. will it be a good idea to use SOAP? –  Shuvra May 10 '11 at 14:24

3 Answers 3

If the table is not updated so often make a "aggregated" table that have better performance.

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aggregated table? –  Magnus May 10 '11 at 14:03
    
I have been using SQL Server 2008. the SP script is created for aggregating data from more then 5 tables. cursor is avoided and I need group by all the data to make small data table. It is actually a matrix like data table. –  Shuvra May 10 '11 at 14:20
    
but i can run this sp in back ground before loading this page. will it be a good idea to use SOAP? –  Shuvra May 10 '11 at 14:22
1  
@Shuvra: with aggregated table, @Pasi probably means that you should store the end-result table (the small one) somewhere into the database in a separate table designed just for this. So querying it would be super fast. A background job on your server would then refresh the data in that table from time to time, so no need to include SOAP in the mix. –  fretje May 11 '11 at 7:43
    
Thanks Pasi and fretje. It is really a good idea. thanks very much for your help. –  Shuvra May 11 '11 at 11:32

If you're churning through 3 or 4 million rows of data and actually doing real work, 20 or 30 seconds is pretty decent performance, IMHO. Check the execution plan of your stored procedure. In the ideal world every table would be getting hit with index seeks rather than table scans. Consult with your DBA if you're not sure how to interpret the showplan results. I assume you're using SQL Server.

Check to make sure your tables have appropriate indices and that the statistics are up to date. Update them if not. Recompile the stored procedure. Parameters passed to the stored procedure can bollux up the cached execution plan, if the are oddball values. You can prevent this by coding your stored procedure like so:

create proc myProc

  @p1 varchar(32) 

as

  declare
    @p1Local varchar(32)

  set @p1Local = @p1

  ...
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I have use index in tables and query plan seems ok. but i can run this sp in back ground before loading this page. will it be a good idea to use SOAP? –  Shuvra May 10 '11 at 14:39
    
What does SOAP have to do with how the execution time of a stored procedure? –  Nicholas Carey May 10 '11 at 14:48
    
Sorry, I have very small idea about WCF/SOAP. actually I am working on web application. therefore, I am thinking, the page where this SP should call and load the dataset. instead of doing that if i call the SP in previous page then the user may see the actual page is loading faster then normal. the SP parameter is selected in log on time. by this way i can slaidly improve the performance. Is it a good idea? any more suggestion. Thanks very much for your help. –  Shuvra May 10 '11 at 15:00

If your data does not get updated too often, you can create an indexed view.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd171921(v=sql.100).aspx:

indexed views provide additional performance benefits that cannot be achieved using standard indexes. Indexed views can increase query performance in the following ways: Aggregations can be precomputed and stored in the index to minimize expensive computations during query execution. Tables can be prejoined and the resulting data set stored. Combinations of joins or aggregations can be stored.

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