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I've been trying to wrap my head around this issue for the last hours but can't figure it out. I guess I still have to get used to the functional programming style ;)

I wrote a recursive function that traverses through a directory structure and does things to certain files. This functions uses the asynchronous IO methods. Now I want to perform some action when this whole traversing is done.

How would I make sure that this action is performed after all parse calls have been performed but still use the asynchronous IO functions?

var fs = require('fs'),
    path = require('path');

function parse(dir) {
    fs.readdir(dir, function (err, files) {
        if (err) {
            console.error(err);
        } else {                
            // f = filename, p = path
            var each = function (f, p) {
                return function (err, stats) {
                    if (err) {
                        console.error(err);
                    } else {
                        if (stats.isDirectory()) {
                            parse(p);
                        } else if (stats.isFile()) {
                            // do some stuff
                        }
                    }
                };
            };

            var i;
            for (i = 0; i < files.length; i++) {
                var f = files[i];
                var p = path.join(dir, f);
                fs.stat(p, each(f, p));
            }
        }
    });
}

parse('.');

// do some stuff here when async parse completely finished
share|improve this question
    
async seems to be the most-used module for dealing with this currently. –  hippietrail Jan 28 '13 at 8:12
    
If you feel aynsc, deferred or step is too heavy to use, like me, use finish. Disclaimer: I'm the creator of finish. –  Chaoran Jan 29 '13 at 17:51
    
finish is now node-finish, so the above link is broken. github.com/chaoran/node-finish –  Fábio Santos May 17 '13 at 11:53
    
For actually making asynchronous calls synchronous, have a look at How to wrap async function calls into a sync function in Node.js or Javascript?. You seem to be looking for synchronous-looking control flow libraries. –  Bergi Jul 10 '14 at 18:03

8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Look for Step module. It can chain asynchronous functions calls and pass results from one to another.

share|improve this answer
26  
Or the async module. –  rjack May 10 '11 at 14:21
    
@rjack, you are right. +1 –  Phillip Kovalev May 10 '11 at 14:41
    
Thanks. I'm now using the async module. Seems to be a pretty handy library. –  Sven Jacobs May 10 '11 at 18:11
2  
Many believe that using "chaining" libraries like step or node-seq impede a developer's appreciation of the asynchronous, i/o driven nature of node.js. Since the vast majority of programming errors I've seen in node are due to lack of understanding of node's model of software design. –  Rob Raisch May 10 '11 at 21:58
2  
See also Q and deferred projects, they're based on deferred/promise concept which in my opinion is much more powerful than simple function chaining. –  Mariusz Nowak Jul 8 '11 at 18:03

Something like this would work -- basic change to your code is the loop turned into a recursive call that consumes a list until it is done. That makes it possible to add an outer callback (where you can do some processing after the parsing is done).

var fs = require('fs'),
  path = require('path');

function parse(dir, cb) {
    fs.readdir(dir, function (err, files) {
        if (err)
          cb(err);
        else 
          handleFiles(dir, files, cb);
    });
}

function handleFiles(dir, files, cb){
  var file = files.shift();
  if (file){
    var p = path.join(dir, file);
    fs.stat(p, function(err, stats){
      if (err)
        cb(err);
      else{
        if (stats.isDirectory())
          parse(p, function(err){
            if (err)
              cb(err);
            else
              handleFiles(dir, files, cb);
          });
        else if (stats.isFile()){
          console.log(p);
          handleFiles(dir, files, cb);
        }
      }
    })
  } else {
    cb();
  }

}


parse('.', function(err){
  if (err)
    console.error(err);
  else {
    console.log('do something else');
  }
});
share|improve this answer
    
If I understand your code correctly the callback would be called as soon as all files from the initial directory have been processed (files is empty). But what about files in subdirectories? Shouldn't they be added to the files array? –  Sven Jacobs May 10 '11 at 16:49
    
The outer callback will only be called when all subdirectories have been recursively searched in a depth first manner. Each inner call to parse provides its own callback, which continues processing the current level when it is called. This code runs -- try it and see what it does. –  Geoff Chappell May 10 '11 at 16:59

Recommend to use node-seq https://github.com/substack/node-seq

installed by npm.

I'm using it, and I love it..

share|improve this answer

Take a look at modification of your original code which does what you want without async helper libs.

var fs = require('fs'),
    path = require('path');

function do_stuff(name, cb)
{
    console.log(name);
    cb();
}

function parse(dir, cb) {
    fs.readdir(dir, function (err, files) {
        if (err) {
            cb(err);
        } else {             

            // cb_n creates a closure
            // which counts its invocations and calls callback on nth
            var n = files.length;
            var cb_n = function(callback)
            {
                return function() {
                    --n || callback();
                }
            }

            // inside 'each' we have exactly n cb_n(cb) calls
            // when all files and dirs on current level are proccessed, 
            // parent cb is called

            // f = filename, p = path
            var each = function (f, p) {
                return function (err, stats) {
                    if (err) {
                        cb(err);
                    } else {
                        if (stats.isDirectory()) {
                            parse(p, cb_n(cb));
                        } else if (stats.isFile()) {
                            do_stuff(p+f, cb_n(cb));
                            // if do_stuff does not have async 
                            // calls inself it might be easier 
                            // to replace line above with
                            //  do_stuff(p+f); cb_n(cb)();
                        }
                    }
                };
            };

            var i;
            for (i = 0; i < files.length; i++) {
                var f = files[i];
                var p = path.join(dir, f);
                fs.stat(p, each(f, p));
            }
        }
    });
}

parse('.', function()
{
    // do some stuff here when async parse completely finished
    console.log('done!!!');
});
share|improve this answer

See following solution, it uses deferred module:

var fs   = require('fs')
  , join = require('path').join
  , promisify = require('deferred').promisify

  , readdir = promisify(fs.readdir), stat = promisify(fs.stat);

function parse (dir) {
    return readdir(dir).map(function (f) {
        return stat(join(dir, f))(function (stats) {
            if (stats.isDirectory()) {
                return parse(dir);
            } else {
                // do some stuff
            }
        });
    });
};

parse('.').done(function (result) {
    // do some stuff here when async parse completely finished
});
share|improve this answer

Look for node-sync, a simple library that allows you to call any asynchronous function in synchronous way. The main benefit is that it uses javascript-native design - Function.prototype.sync function, instead of heavy APIs which you'll need to learn. Also, asynchronous function which was called synchronously through node-sync doesn't blocks the whole process - it blocks only current thread!

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I've been using syncrhonize.js with great success. There's even a pending pull request (which works quite well) to support async functions which have multiple parameters. Far better and easier to use than node-sync imho. Added bonus that it has easy-to-understand and thorough documentation, whereas node-sync does not.

Supports two different methods for wiring up the sync, a defered/await model (like what @Mariusz Nowak was suggesting) and a slimmer though not-as-granular function-target approach. The docs are pretty straightforward for each.

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You could use async module . Its auto function is awesome . If you have function A() and function B() and function C() . Both function B() and C() depend of function A() that is using value return from function A() . using async module function you could make sure that function B and C will execute only when function A execution is completed .

Ref : https://github.com/caolan/async

async.auto({
            A: functionA(){//code here },
            B: ['A',functionB(){//code here }],
            C: ['A',functionC(){//code here }],
            D: [ 'B','C',functionD(){//code here }]
        }, function (err, results) {
              //results is an array that contains the results of all the function defined and executed by async module
              // if there is an error executing any of the function defined in the async then error will be sent to err  and as soon as err will be produced execution of other function will be terminated
            }
        })
    });

In above example functionB and functionC will execute together once function A execution will be completed . Thus functionB and functionC will be executed simultaneously

functionB: ['A',functionB(){//code here }]

In above line we are passing value return by functionA using 'A'

and functionD will be executed only when functionB and functionC execution will be completed .

if there will be error in any function , then execution of other function will be terminated and below function will be executed .where you could write your logic of success and failure .

function (err, results) {}

On succesfull execution of all function "results" will contain the result of all the functions defined in async.auto

function (err, results) {}
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