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I am trying to configure clustered JMS on Weblogic 10.3.4.

I have a 4 node cluster plus my AdminServer already configured. I also have my JMS already configured and targeted to AdminServer. From reading the Weblogic documentation, I am not clear as how to cluster the JMS server. Could someone please explain how?

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There is no 'clustered JMS server'. There are WebLogic clusters, the Admin Server & Managed Servers and then JMS Servers. JMS Servers are a configuration construct within a Managed Server.

In order to cluster JMS in WebLogic each managed server in the cluster needs a JMS server. Then, when you create JMS resources you can either use default targeting or subdeployments. If you use default targeting then it will implicitly target the resource to the JMS server for each managed server in the cluster. If you have more than one JMS server per managed server, the behavior can be different, but you likely don't need that. Alternatively, you can use subdeployments to target specific managed servers or JMS servers, but not likely needed for your purposes.

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Thank you for the reply. I see how I can make 4 different JMS Servers, one for each managed server. I also see how I can make my JMS module targeted to the cluster. But I see that I can only make a subdeployment targeted to 1 managed server. Do I need to make 4 subdeployments and therefore have to define my JMS queues 4 times? –  Matt May 10 '11 at 14:33
    
No, you can use default targeting to target t othe cluster. You will want to use Distributed Queue or Distributed Topic as your destination type –  Jeff West May 10 '11 at 14:56
    
You don't need subdeployments for a simple distributed queue. –  Jeff West May 10 '11 at 14:57

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