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I wonder if its possible to edit the attributes value that the @Html.EditorFor(model => item.Title) is generating

the @Html.EditorFor(model => item.Title) would generate this:

<input class="text-box single-line" id="item_Title" name="item.Title" type="text" value="Avatar" />

i wonder if its possible to edit the id attribut?

Thanks!

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2 Answers

I don't think you can edit the id since the point of EditorFor is that it's "bound" to the model's property that you're applying it to. If you need a different id, you could try making your own text box with Html.TextBox.

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I thought it was the name that is bound to the property - not the id. (One reason that you can't easily change the name when using something like Html.TextBoxFor, but you can change the id.) –  JasCav May 10 '11 at 17:59
    
It's bound to both. That's how it is able to update your model because it requires a specific id. Why do you need to change the id of the text box? Maybe there's a way to do what you're trying to do without modifying it? –  Shane Andrade May 11 '11 at 19:52
    
Huh. If that's the case, I am suddenly very confused why I have been able to change my IDs of helper methods (although...not of an "EditorFor") and have the binding still work. –  JasCav May 11 '11 at 21:45
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Create your own Editor template to custom render whatever you want. See: http://www.codecapers.com/post/Display-and-Editor-Templates-in-ASPNET-MVC-2.aspx You then have control over how the editor html is emitted. you MAY though have to do a bit of lambda parsing magic to get the model variable name. I'd have to research that more - just wanted to give a pointer here in case no one else replied.

In this case though, you 'MAY' have to instead write your own extension method that takes the lambda and creates the names based off that lambda. You can see how the lambda is parsed as an example here: http://blogs.planetcloud.co.uk/mygreatdiscovery/post/Creating-tooltips-using-data-annotations-in-ASPNET-MVC.aspx

this all may not be too helful.. but want to provide at least something else : )

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thanks for the respons, i will look into it –  RoyFat May 10 '11 at 18:19
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