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Is there a way to validate (verify that its constructed correctly) a Sizzle selector without running it?

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What is an example of an incorrectly constructed selector? –  Roatin Marth May 10 '11 at 15:54
    
ehhh you can check it in a javascript console –  Neal May 10 '11 at 15:54
    
@roatin: ## or a[ or . or lots of other strings. –  SLaks May 10 '11 at 15:56
    
What are you trying to accomplish? if your worried about speed what about just suppling an empty context $(selector, emptyContext). –  Rob May 10 '11 at 16:02
    
@Roatin: Anything that doesn't match the grammar for the language: w3.org/TR/css3-selectors/#w3cselgrammar –  wsanville May 10 '11 at 16:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Well, as Russ says, since Sizzle interprets the selector, it cannot validate it without evaluating it.

However, you can catch the exception thrown by Sizzle to determine if a selector is valid or not:

function isSelectorValid(selector)
{
    try {
        $(selector);
    } catch (x) {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Your can test this solution here.


EDIT: For the sake of history, my original (and overengineered) answer was:

However, it's possible to temporarily override Sizzle's error management in order to extract a boolean value from the error status of its last parse operation. The following solution takes advantage of the fact that jQuery exposes Sizzle through $.find (so far):

function isSelectorValid(selector)
{
    var oldErrorMethod = $.find.error;
    try {
        $.find.error = function(msg) {
            valid = false;
            oldErrorMethod(msg);
        };
        $(selector);
        return true;
    } catch (x) {
        return false;
    } finally {
        $.find.error = oldErrorMethod;
    }
}

That can arguably be considered as a horrible hack, but it works: you can test it here.

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2  
You could also just return false in the catch block. –  SLaks May 10 '11 at 16:50
    
@SLaks, excellent point! I'll update my answer right away, thanks :) –  Frédéric Hamidi May 10 '11 at 16:54
    
Good solution Frédéric! –  Russ C May 10 '11 at 16:59
1  
You don't need to override error at all. –  SLaks May 10 '11 at 17:14
    
@SLaks, you're absolutely right, I guess I got completely carried away. Answer amended, now I think I'll carry myself away from the computer for a bit. Thanks again for the heads-up :) –  Frédéric Hamidi May 10 '11 at 17:26

Not quite, the Sizzle engine isn't compiled so the only way to check the validity of the selector is to select it.

However, you can do something like this:

var selector = ...construct your selector ...
if ($(selector).length > 0) {
 // it worked.
}
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3  
This doesn't distinguish a selector which does not match the grammar for selectors from a valid selector which is valid, yet matches no elements. –  wsanville May 10 '11 at 16:06

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