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I encountered a strange bug in python where using the __new__ method of a class as a factory would lead to the __init__ method of the instantiated class to be called twice.

The idea was originally to use the __new__ method of the mother class to return a specific instance of one of her children depending on the parameters that are passed, without having to declare a factory function outside of the class.

I know that using a factory function would be the best design-pattern to use here, but changing the design pattern at this point of the project would be costly. My question hence is: is there a way to avoid the double call to __init__ and get only a single call to __init__ in such a schema ?

class Shape(object):
    def __new__(cls, desc):
        if cls is Shape:
            if desc == 'big':   return Rectangle(desc)
            if desc == 'small': return Triangle(desc)
        else:
            return super(Shape, cls).__new__(cls, desc)

    def __init__(self, desc):
        print "init called"
        self.desc = desc

class Triangle(Shape):
    @property
    def number_of_edges(self): return 3

class Rectangle(Shape):
    @property
    def number_of_edges(self): return 4

instance = Shape('small')
print instance.number_of_edges

>>> init called
>>> init called
>>> 3

Any help greatly appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

When you construct an object Python calls its __new__ method to create the object then calls __init__ on the object that is returned. When you create the object from inside __new__ by calling Triangle() that will result in further calls to __new__ and __init__.

What you should do is:

class Shape(object):
    def __new__(cls, desc):
        if cls is Shape:
            if desc == 'big':   return super(Shape, cls).__new__(Rectangle)
            if desc == 'small': return super(Shape, cls).__new__(Triangle)
        else:
            return super(Shape, cls).__new__(cls, desc)

which will create a Rectangle or Triangle without triggering a call to __init__ and then __init__ is called only once.

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Thanks a lot, this solved my problem perfectly. –  xApple May 11 '11 at 7:58
    
Wouldn't it be better to use return Rectangle.__new__(Rectangle) because this would guarantee that __new__ of Rectangle gets called if it's defined? –  Georg Schölly May 12 '11 at 18:38
2  
@Georg, If you do that you are going to have to be pretty careful to avoid infinite recursion. Any class specific initialisation should be in __init__ so I think it is pretty safe here to assume that __new__'s only job is to create an object of the correct type. –  Duncan May 13 '11 at 9:22
    
The code in your answer fixes the problem but doesn't explain why Shape.__init__() was called twice in the OP's code, even when Shape.__new__() returns a Triangle(desc). This seems contrary to what the docs say: "If __new__() does not return an instance of cls, then the new instance’s __init__() method will not be invoked." –  martineau Jan 28 '13 at 0:33
    
Never mind, I'm guessing in the OP's code it's isinstance(<returned object>, Shape) being True for a Triangle object that's allowing the Shape.__init__() method to be called on it. –  martineau Jan 28 '13 at 1:01

After posting my question, I continued searching for a solution an found a way to solve the problem that looks like a bit of a hack. It is inferior to Duncan's solution, but I thought it could be interesting to mention none the less. The Shapeclass becomes:

class ShapeFactory(type):
    def __call__(cls, desc):
        if cls is Shape:
            if desc == 'big':   return Rectangle(desc)
            if desc == 'small': return Triangle(desc)
        return type.__call__(cls, desc)

class Shape(object):
    __metaclass__ = ShapeFactory 
    def __init__(self, desc):
        print "init called"
        self.desc = desc
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Why do you say this is inferior to Duncan's solution. This seems much clearer to what's going on, imo less hacky. Also meta. –  Andy Hayden Sep 22 '13 at 1:14
1  
I thought it was less obvious because it adds a fourth class to the program and involves the __metaclass__ black magic that not everyone is familiar with. –  xApple Sep 25 '13 at 8:22

I can't actually reproduce this behavior in either of the Python interpreters I have installed, so this is something of a guess. However...

__init__ is being called twice because you are initializing two objects: the original Shape object, and then one of its subclasess. If you change your __init__ so it also prints the class of the object being initialized, you will see this.

print type(self), "init called"

This is harmless because the original Shape will be discarded, since you are not returning a reference to it in your __new__().

Since calling a function is syntactically identical to instantiating a class, you can change this to a function without changing anything else, and I recommend that you do exactly that. I don't understand your reluctance.

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1  
This is not correct - the first __init__ call happens inside the outer __new__ call (when Triangle() and Rectangle() are called), but then, because an instance of Shape is returned by __new__, the original Shape() call invokes __init__ again on that already initialised object. Note that if the object returned by __new__() is not an instance of Shape() then __init__ won't be called (which can foul up attempts to observe this behaviour if the class hierarchy isn't right). –  ncoghlan May 11 '11 at 3:26
    
Indeed, both are syntactically identical. My reluctance stems from the fact that if I define a function called "Shape", I must rename my class to something like "_Shape". This will cause some variable renaming, of course, but mostly it will have complicated consequences on other things like the documentation that is generated by sphinx-autodoc. –  xApple May 11 '11 at 8:02
    
I suppose you do want to expose documentation on those classes so you can't just declare them in the function. You might try just reassigning the instance's __class__ attribute in __init__() and not messing with __new__() at all. –  kindall May 11 '11 at 13:55
    
... one of the pitfalls of this, by the way, is that you will have to manually re-bind the instance methods from the correct class to the instance. –  kindall May 11 '11 at 16:57
    
Another approach might be to use a metaclass to override the __call__() method on the class, so that the () syntax does not necessarily instantiate the class. –  kindall May 11 '11 at 17:49

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