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Creating a GUI with JFC/Swing > Perform Custom Painting : Refining the Design

I was reading through the tutorial linked above and a portion of the example code has me perplexed. According to the code comment in the moveSquare method, storing location information as final local variables will

'avoid repeat invocations of the same methods'

This makes absolutely no sense to me and I was hoping that someone could expound on the meaning of the comment. (see link above for full source and tutorial commentary)

class MyPanel extends JPanel {

RedSquare redSquare = new RedSquare();

public MyPanel() {

    setBorder(BorderFactory.createLineBorder(Color.black));

    addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter(){
        public void mousePressed(MouseEvent e){
            moveSquare(e.getX(),e.getY());
        }
    });

    addMouseMotionListener(new MouseAdapter(){
        public void mouseDragged(MouseEvent e){
            moveSquare(e.getX(),e.getY());
        }
    });

}

private void moveSquare(int x, int y){

    // Current square state, stored as final variables 
    // to avoid repeat invocations of the same methods.
    final int CURR_X = redSquare.getX();
    final int CURR_Y = redSquare.getY();
    final int CURR_W = redSquare.getWidth();
    final int CURR_H = redSquare.getHeight();
    final int OFFSET = 1;

    if ((CURR_X!=x) || (CURR_Y!=y)) {

        // The square is moving, repaint background 
        // over the old square location. 
        repaint(CURR_X,CURR_Y,CURR_W+OFFSET,CURR_H+OFFSET);

        // Update coordinates.
        redSquare.setX(x);
        redSquare.setY(y);

        // Repaint the square at the new location.
        repaint(redSquare.getX(), redSquare.getY(), 
                redSquare.getWidth()+OFFSET, 
                redSquare.getHeight()+OFFSET);
    }
}

public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
    return new Dimension(250,200);
}

public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
    super.paintComponent(g);       
    g.drawString("This is my custom Panel!",10,20);

    redSquare.paintSquare(g);
}  
}
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This means that the result from calling getX() or the other methods is saved in a variable and reused so that you don't have to keep calling those methods every time you need the X or Y.

This has three advantages:

  1. The code is more readable due to the variable names
  2. Performance is improved due to the methods not having to be called again and again
  3. Future changes are possibly easier because you only have to change method names in one place for example.
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2  
+0: All good stuff and I often use final variables for these reasons, but I would say the code fails on every count in this case. 1. I don't think CURR_W is any clearer than getWidth() 2. getWidth()/getHeight() is called but might not be used if the condition fails they waste time instead of helping. They are used at most once, saving nothing. 3. The getX(), getY() etc are called again later so you haven't saved much. IMHO, IDE refactoring should be used to rename methods esp getters with setters. –  Peter Lawrey May 10 '11 at 17:37
1  
@Peter, I agree, the example from the question is a poor example of saving results in final variables, however, I was trying to explain the meaning behind the comment and the advantages that are possible, but of course not a guarantee. –  jzd May 10 '11 at 17:44
    
Thanks everyone for your answers... I wish I could pick more than one for the official solution!! –  new Thrall May 10 '11 at 17:46
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Making the local variable final makes no real difference as you suspect. It can help the JVM optimise the code in some cases, however the JVM is fairly smart these days and it doesn't help much.

The real difference is the fact the results are stored as local variables at all, to avoid method calls.

However, since the method calls are likely to be trivial getters, the JVM can inline those methods, so the performance difference, may not be great.

If the variable is not accessed or only accessed once as some of these are, they might hurt performance.

The repaint is likely to be 1000x times more expensive than this method, making the changes here not so important.

In general, I recommend making code simple and clear the most important factor in writing code, and often the JVM will optimise simple and clear code very efficiently.

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Final variables can only have their value set once.

It literally will generate a compiler error if you try to set the value of a final variable more than once, or write a function to set the value of a final member variable. This makes sure that you cannot set the value more than once, which can avoid repeat invocations of the same method. For example, if you tried to write again:

CURR_X = redSquare.getX();

You would get an error because you already set that final variable. So you're avoiding the repeat invocation of redSquare.getX(). In this case, it doesn't really do much, but in other implementations with other objects, that method could spawn a huge calculation.

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The code only uses the value twice and calls redSquare.getX() later anyway. ;) –  Peter Lawrey May 10 '11 at 17:22
    
Yeah, that seems pretty odd, especially given the comment. I'm not sure what's up with that. –  Erick Robertson May 10 '11 at 17:27
    
I would hope that the last getX() returns the same value the code just called setX(x) if the width or height changes, it doesn't redraw until it moves ?? –  Peter Lawrey May 10 '11 at 17:30
2  
Ah.. the comment is referring to the redSquare.get methods and not to the moveSquare method. That is what was confuzzling me. I thought it was talking about invocations of moveSquare which had me baffled. It would have made more sense to me if the comment just said, // using final variables to prevent reassignment of CURR_X, etc. as Peter pointed out... it isn't preventing method calls (redSquare.getX() is used later again.) It is preventing CURR_X, etc. from being modified (via method call or expression evaluation or whatever). –  new Thrall May 10 '11 at 17:35
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It's all about the moveSquare function -- which is the same to this:

private void moveSquare(int x, int y){

    final int OFFSET = 1;

    if ((redSquare.getX()!=x) || (redSquare.getY()!=y)) {

        // The square is moving, repaint background 
        // over the old square location. 
        repaint(redSquare.getX(),redSquare.getY(),redSquare.getWidth()+OFFSET,redSquare.getHeight()+OFFSET);

        // Update coordinates.
        redSquare.setX(x);
        redSquare.setY(y);

        // Repaint the square at the new location.
        repaint(redSquare.getX(), redSquare.getY(), 
                redSquare.getWidth()+OFFSET, 
                redSquare.getHeight()+OFFSET);
    }
}

as you can see, by not using those constants (which are initialized just once) you end up calling getX() and getY() for instance 2 more times (though I think the JIT compiler will optimize that!) -- however, you saved those 2 calls by introducing these constants. (This will only work if the value of X is not changed in those lines of code when the constants are used -- if for instance the line after if ((redSquare.getX()!=x) || (redSquare.getY()!=y)) changes the value of X or Y you won't be able to use the constants approach and will have to call the functions as shown above in order to have the correct values.)

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