Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
How to get function's name from function's pointer in C?

I'm printing the configuration for the program to the command line each run, and one thing that I would like printed is the current hash function being used -- which is stored in a function pointer variable.

Is there a way to do something along the lines of:
std::cout << function_pointer.function_name_to_text() << "\n";

So like, if I have a function called sha1(char * pre_image), it would just output sha1 to the console? the entire method header would be grand too.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Demian Brecht, BЈовић, Bo Persson, GManNickG, Chris Lutz May 10 '11 at 18:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Relates? stackoverflow.com/questions/351134/… –  SubSevn May 10 '11 at 18:26
1  
You could create your own function pointer class that requires function names. For function objects or functors this would be a good idea for debug releases. –  Thomas Matthews May 10 '11 at 18:53
    
Marking and closing this question as duplicate with a similar question specific to the C language prevents someone from giving a C++ specific answer. –  alfC Jan 24 at 5:54
    
since I can't post an answer I'll put my code here. It is system dependent and it works in Linux, with gcc 4.8.2 and the -rdynamic -ldl flags: template<class CFunction, typename = typename std::enable_if<std::is_function<typename std::remove_pointer<CFunction>::type>::value>::type> std::string function_arg_name(CFunction f){ Dl_info info; dladdr((void const*)f, &info); return demangle(info.dli_sname); }. (demangle is an obvious function based on abi::__cxa_demangle). You call it like this std::string fn = function_arg_name(&fun); //or ...(fun) –  alfC Jan 24 at 5:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't get the function name at run-time since function names don't exist after compilation.

You can however build a separate lookup function that would save the name and associate it with the function pointer:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <boost/preprocessor/stringize.hpp>

typedef void (*fptr_t)(char*);
typedef std::map<fptr_t, std::string> function_map_t;
function_map_t fmap;

#define REGISTER_FUNCTION(f) fmap[f] = BOOST_PP_STRINGIZE(f);

void sha1(char*) {}  // a function you want to lookup

int main() {
      REGISTER_FUNCTION(sha1)
      fptr_t my_pointer = sha1;
      std::cout << "Function name is: " << fmap[my_pointer] << std::endl;
      return 0;
}

EDIT: Updated to compile

share|improve this answer
    
I got some errors:src/main.h:24: error: ISO C++ forbids declaration of ‘fptr_t’ with no type src/main.cpp: In function ‘int main(int, const char**)’: src/main.cpp:37: error: ‘f’ was not declared in this scope –  NullVoxPopuli May 10 '11 at 18:56
    
main: 37 is the REGISTER_FUNCTION(func_pointer), the rest is in the header file. =\ –  NullVoxPopuli May 10 '11 at 18:59
    
The above edited version should compile. –  vsekhar May 11 '11 at 4:01

There is no way to do this in the C++ language as it does not support reflection. The __FUNCTION__ macro is a non-standard way to get the current (meaning what the compiler is now compiling) function name. It is built-in on many platforms, but not all. You might be able to use that to get close to what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have an example? –  NullVoxPopuli May 10 '11 at 18:32
    
void foo(int x) { printf("Current function: %s(%d)\n", __FUNCTION__, x); Will print out:"Current function: foo([parameter value])" –  Dan F May 10 '11 at 18:36
    
No, and the more I think about it, I'm not sure how useful it is if you need the function name in a context where all you have is a pointer variable containing the function pointer. The table approach mentioned in the accepted answer of the linked dupe may be your best bet. My primary use for __FUNCTION__ is for logging/throwing errors. –  Steve Fallows May 10 '11 at 18:39
    
The C99 standard (and the upcoming C++ norm) offers static const char __func__[] as a predefined symbol in each function. This should work with more compilers (although __FUNCTION__ is quite common too). –  Fififox May 10 '11 at 18:42
    
Since I'm calling the function hundreds of times... I only need to print the name of it once... like.. outside of the function that I need the name of. –  NullVoxPopuli May 10 '11 at 19:04

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.