Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way I can do something like

@sortType

SELECT
    *
FROM
    table
ORDER BY
    -- if sortType == id
    table.Id
    -- else if sortType == date
    table.Date

How would that syntax look? Thanks.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There's a gotcha here... you can't mix data types in your case statement, so you need to create different groups of case statements for the different data types.

SELECT
    *
FROM
    table
ORDER BY
    CASE WHEN @SortType = id THEN table.Id END ASC,
    CASE WHEN @SortType != id THEN table.Date END ASC

Related blog post:

http://dirk.net/2006/11/14/dynamic-order-by-with-case-statement-in-sql-server-data-type-issues/

share|improve this answer
    
Would I be able to add DESC|ASC to this? –  slandau May 10 '11 at 19:36
    
Yes, you can add the DESC / ASC to each individual case statement... and if you wanted, ID could be ASC, Date could be DESC... etc... –  Michael Fredrickson May 10 '11 at 19:41
    
I'm giving you the answer, even though I used a mix of your answer and Remus' –  slandau May 10 '11 at 20:06

Try

ORDER BY
case when @sortType = 'id' then
table.Id
else 
table.Date end

Caution: That said, for performance reason it is probably better to split it up or use dynamic sql with sp_executesql

share|improve this answer
    
I added a blurb, I just wanted to show the technique of using the CASE statement –  SQLMenace May 10 '11 at 19:43

Don't ever do something like that. The resulted query plan will have to satisfy both conditions, since the plan is generic and not tied to a specific runtime value of the @variables. Such plan will miss a lot of possible optimizations. You should explicitly separate the queries:

@sortType

if @sortType == id
  SELECT
    *
  FROM
    table
  ORDER BY
    table.Id
else if @sortType == date
  SELECT
    *
  FROM
    table
  ORDER BY
    table.Date

This is the very same issue as trying to implement dynamic search conditions. The syntactic sugar of using a CASE in the ORDER BY is actually a query optimization blocker.

share|improve this answer
    
Will it hurt optimization terribly? –  slandau May 10 '11 at 19:40
    
For sure it will eliminate possible optimizations. Your query is generic, it uses * and has no WHERE clauses so is not a god example. In the real world the optimizations missed can be quite significant. Read the article linked for dynamic search, is quite revealing. –  Remus Rusanu May 10 '11 at 19:44
1  
Yeah that was just for the example, my real query is a lot more complex. I'm just trying to eliminate duplicating all the code. –  slandau May 10 '11 at 19:45
    
To be clear: such a construct will always require a sort. Ie. read the whole table, sort it, then return the first row. Splitting the query may use an index to satisfy the ORDER BY, thus avoiding the (very expensive) sort. So yes, it will hurt 'terribly'. –  Remus Rusanu May 10 '11 at 19:47
    
Unfortunately T-SQL is not a friendly language for code reuse, because it is a language that is actually driven by your data, not by your T-SQL text: the queries compile to data access plans that are dependent on your indexes. Viable solutions are using dynamic SQL (has pros and cons) or using T-SQL code generation (is difficult to bootstratp, but has a lot of pros once implemented). –  Remus Rusanu May 10 '11 at 19:51

or just cast the date to an integer...

  ... ORDER BY case 
           When @sortType = 'id' Then table.Id 
           Else cast(table.Date As Integer) end 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.