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I'm curious about adding references through the "Property Pages" dialog in Visual Studio C++. Specifically adding 'class libraries' and, even more so, 'namespaces'.

In what I'm reading it says that both 'class library's and 'namespaces' can be referenced in this way-- I can see what the reference for 'class libraries' are for (bringing in a dll to be able to access it's '.h' files and such-- correct me if I'm wrong). But what does referencing a namespace do? I understand the 'using' declarative allows you to not qualify the namespace anymore-- is this 'referencing namespaces' just another way to do that?

To clarify by what I mean by 'referencing': I'm talking about when right clicking on a project in the solution explorer and selecting 'References' which then brings up the 'Property Pages' dialog and then finally selecting the 'Add New Reference...' button.

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Is this .Net? 'Class library' sounds like a .Net thing. If not please clarify where these are, I don't see them in my project settings. –  Arelius May 10 '11 at 20:14
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Are you sure you're using C++? –  John Dibling May 10 '11 at 20:15
    
Yes it's .Net. 'Class Library' just means a .dll file full of classes I believe. yes, I'm using C++. I'm talking about when right clicking on a project in the solution explorer and selecting 'References' which then brings up the 'Property Pages' dialog and then finally selecting the 'Add New Reference...' button. –  Rune Star May 10 '11 at 20:33
    
If it's .NET then it's most likely C++/CLI which not C++. A similar language with the intention of making it easy to write glue code for existing codebase. –  Tamás Szelei May 10 '11 at 20:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

'Add a reference' in .NET is somewhat like #includeing in normal C++. It allows you to use classes and namespaces inside another .cs file, that is not in the project, e.g., system libraries.
If you're coding normal C++, don't worry about it.

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Am I right in the following? With #include ing, the file/s must be in the same directory as the file that is doing the #include ing. But with 'Add a Reference' it makes it so you can still utilize the chosen file even when it is in a different location. Is this the basic difference? –  Rune Star Jul 12 '11 at 19:38
    
Bump. [Will delete when previous comment is answered...] –  Rune Star Jul 14 '11 at 20:04

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