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Let's say I have a module Bar that is a subclass wrapper for module Foo. I want calls to Bar's methods to mimic Foo's exactly -- even down to fatal errors. So far, easy enough; I just call the SUPER method.


sub stuff {
    # Do stuff here

    SUPER::stuff(@_);

    # Do more stuff here
}

But, let's say that I want to catch, log, and rethrow any fatal errors SUPER::stuff() produces. First two steps are easy:


sub stuff {
    # Do stuff here

    eval {
        SUPER::stuff(@_);
    };
    $@ and log("Naughty, naughty: $@");

    # Do more stuff here
}

... but I don't know how to do the last part. How do I re-throw the error in such a way that the caller will be unable to distinguish between a call to Foo->stuff() and a call to Bar->stuff()? Can I just insert die $@ after the log statement and expect it to do what I want, or are there nuances here that would likely get me into trouble?

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5  
Avoid using checking $@ after eval, especially with OO code. See Try::Tiny –  mob May 10 '11 at 20:16
1  
@mob: That is ridiculous. –  tchrist May 11 '11 at 23:10
    
@tchrist, I agree, but I have also seen the $@ gets reset after an eval bug crop up in production code. –  Ven'Tatsu May 12 '11 at 14:50
    
@Ven'Tatsu: Do you feel that the 5.14 fixes to $@ treatment address this? –  tchrist May 12 '11 at 15:03
    
@tchrist, It looks like it will. –  Ven'Tatsu May 12 '11 at 18:58

3 Answers 3

The full code to safely eval/catch/log/rethrow in Perl can be a bit verbose.

sub stuff {
    # Do stuff here

    local $@; # don't reset $@ for our caller.
    my $eval_ok = eval { # get the return from eval, it will be undef if the eval catches an error.
        SUPER::stuff(@_);
        1; # return 1 (true) if there are no errors caught.
    };
    if (!$eval_ok) { # don't trust $@ it might have been reset as the eval unrolled.
        my $error = $@ || 'unknown error'; # copy $@ incase write_log resets $@, or is later changed to cause it to reset $@.
        write_log("Naughty, naughty: $error");
        die $error; # after all that we can rethrow our error.
    }

    # Do more stuff here
}

You can use Try::Tiny sugested by mob to simplify:

sub stuff {
    # Do stuff here

    try {
        SUPER::stuff(@_);
    } catch {
        my $error = $_;
        write_log("Naughty, naughty: $error");
        die $error;
    }

    # Do more stuff here
}
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What you're proposing will work. Perl doesn't have structured exceptions so the data in $@ is all the caller would get anyway.

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1  
But $@ can hold an object, which can give you structured exceptions. –  tchrist May 12 '11 at 20:06
    
@tchrist: But if I just re-die with $@ as my argument, am I losing any data? (Assuming I store $@ to another var so it doesn't get overwritten by something else, etc.) –  BlairHippo May 18 '11 at 14:31
    
Good point tchrist. I'd forgotten about that. –  Dan May 31 '11 at 2:46
 eval {
        SUPER::stuff(@_);
    };
    $@ and ( log("Naughty, naughty: $@"), die $@ );
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You example calls log and then calls die, due to the global nature of $@ you can't trust that log won't change or reset the value in $@ before it's passed to die. –  Ven'Tatsu May 11 '11 at 21:53

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